Archive for March, 2010

Meen Pollichathu – Roasted Pomfret Steamed in Banana Leaves – A Kerala Delicacy


2010
03.23

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You know your family eats a lot of fish when your preschooler looks into the fish tank at school and screams, “Look Mama, fish!! Yummy!!”. Then, pretends to reach out and gulp down the little fishes, rubs his tiny pot belly and says “Mmm tasty, that was goood!!”. Of course, I gave my usual God-whose-kid-is-that?  look and walked away, pretending like I had nothing to do with him. Don’t worry, I never lose him during these acts of disownment. The little piece of embarrassment always follows me, like a gosling does a mother goose. I don’t blame him either – obviously, the only reason I didn’t abandon him completely and let him hold my hand a little while later (when I was sure, we were off the radar of the folks who heard his verbal sacrilege by the aquarium), was because I understand it must be hard for his 3 year old brain to distinguish pet from food, when most of time, we are serving him dinner with what the neighbors flaunt around as pets :P.

Yes, we the Tharakans, are die-hard carnivores and fish for us is a staple. Our recent favorite has become the Meen Pollichathu. Traditionally, this recipe requires that the fish along with the spices be wrapped tight in banana leaves and roasted on a greased pan, allowing the fish to cook in the steam trapped inside the leaves. Instead of grilling them in a pan, I bake them in the oven. The banana leaf imparts an amazing flavor to the fish  and if you are lucky to get your hands on some(I get mine from the Asian market), that would be the ideal way to make this recipe. If you can’t, use aluminum foil for wrapping and rest assured, minus the banana leaf flavor, everything else will taste just like the original.

If it is your first time trying this recipe, I’d suggest you use one of the less fishy fishes like salmon, halibut, tilapia or any other of your favorites. If you like it, only then try the recipe with the whole pomfrets. I say this because fish recipes can get too overbearing at times and you need to approach it with caution until you have acquired a taste for it.  Also if you are using fillet and not the whole fish, reduce the spices a tad bit and use only 1/2 the quantity of lemon juice mentioned in the recipe.

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Ingredients

2 whole small pomfrets, cleaned 
salt  to taste 
11/2 tsp black pepper powder
1 tsp turmeric powder
4 tbsp lemon juice
1 tsp chili powder
1 tsp paprika
1 tsp coriander powder
1/4 tsp kerala garam masala
1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds powdered
2 tbsp ginger garlic paste
2 tbsp coconut Oil/ refined vegetable oil
1 tsp black mustard seeds
2 –3 sprigs of curry leaves
1 cup finely sliced shallot
2 green chilies
2 medium tomatoes. chopped
3/4 cup thick coconut milk (from the can would be perfect)
12 thin slices of fresh lemon ( this makes a huge difference in the taste and is a must)

Directions

  • Make a few slits till the bone on both sides of the fishes, perpendicular to the spine. (If you are using  fillets, omit this step)
  • Mix salt, 1 tsp black pepper powder, 1/2 tsp turmeric powder, 1/2 tsp each of red chili and paprika powder and 1/2 tbsp of ginger-garlic paste and lemon juice in a bowl.
  • Marinate the fish with the above mixture inside out and let it sit in the fridge for 3-4 hours.
  • Heat oil in a pan, slightly roast the fish until it is caramelized on both sides but not fully cooked.
  • Take out the fish and set aside. If there is any liquid from the marinade left, keep it aside to add while making the masala.
  • In the same pan, splutter mustard seeds, add fenugreek powder, green chilies, curry leaves, shallots and sauté until the shallots are golden brown.
    Add tomatoes, all the remaining spice powders, ginger-garlic, leftover marinade and sauté  until the tomatoes form a mush.
  • Add thick coconut milk and salt to the masala and sauté on low heat until the masala mixture thickens and reduces to about half the original quantity.
  • Add fish and coat it thoroughly with the masala gravy.
  • Wrap each fish along with 6 lemon slices each(3 on each side) in a piece of banana leaf or greased foil. Secure with tooth pick if using a the leaf.
  • Bake at 350ºF for 20 minutes.
  • Garnish with lemon wedges and onions, serve hot.
  • Sweet Potato Dal / Lentils and Sweet Potato


    2010
    03.22

    In my forever quest to find healthy foods that my  little boy will like,  I’ve stumbled upon many recipes that have turned out to be my favorites too. This is one of them. I’ve always been a big fan of sweet potatoes. Both, the yellow kind we used to get in India, and the orange ones in the US. My Mother always served them steamed with a simple, crushed green chili chutney. I remembered that the sweetness from the spuds and the heat from the chilies always managed to excite my then young taste buds . Hoping for the remote possibility, that Nish might similarly like the hot and sweet combo (after all I furnished the ‘X’) I decided to make a dal out of it. Roy and I loved it so much that Nish liking it became just an added bonus ;).

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    Ingredients:

    1 cup bengal gram / channa dal soaked in water for an hour or 2
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 – 3 tbsp refined oil
    1 medium sized onion finely chopped
    1tsp dry roasted and crushed cumin, or 1 1/2 tsp whole cumin
    1tsp garlic finely chopped
    1tsp ginger finely grated
    2 –3 green chilies finely chopped
    2 tomatoes, finely diced
    2 tsp amchoor (powdered dry mango)
    1 tsp coriander powder
    2 –3 sprigs chopped cilantro
    2 cup sweet potatoes, peeled and diced
    salt to taste

    Optional Final Seasoning
    2 tsp ghee (clarified butter)
    1 tsp of cumin

    Directions

  • Heat oil in a pan, add, cumin and onions and sauté until onions are slightly caramelized.
  • Add crushed ginger and garlic and continue to sauté until oil separates.
  • Add tomatoes , green chilies, coriander powder and turmeric and sauté until tomatoes are mushy.
  • Add dal and sweet potatoes to the mixture in the pan.
  • Add 3 –4 cups of hot water, close the pot with a lid and let it cook. Stir occasionally. (I do this in a pressure cooker and allow it to whistle twice and let it simmer on low flame for 10 minutes)
  • When the dal is cooked the mixture gets creamy and thick. Add more hot water based on desired consistency.
  • Garnish with chopped cilantro
  • Serve with Rice or Indian Breads.

    Before garnishing with cilantro, to increase flavor roast 1 tsp of cumin  in 2 tsp of hot ghee and pour over Dal to season.

  • Sautéed Tindora (Ivy Gourd/kovakka) with Coconut and Tamarind


    2010
    03.21

    Finishing up with the last few bags of frozen veggies, and so it is going to be Tindora tonight. This mildly sweet, spicy and tangy dish used to be my sister S’ favorite. As a child I used to wonder why. But now I totally understand. I love it too. Strange how with age, your taste buds change too! :^).

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    Ingredients

    1.5 lb Tindora/Ivy gourd cut into long thin slices
    1 cup fresh grated coconut 
    1 tbsp coriander seeds
    1/4 tsp turmeric powder
    1 tbsp split urad dal/ black gram
    1 tbsp tamarind paste or a lemon size ball of pitted tamarind
    3-4 dried red chilies
    1 tsp black mustard seeds
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    2 tbsp jaggery shavings
    a pinch of asafoetida
    salt to taste
    2 tbsp refined oil

    Directions

  • Heat 1 tsp of oil in a pan and roast the coriander seeds, urad dal and red chilies until the seeds turn brown and fragrant.
  • Grind coconut with the roasted mixture, salt, tamarind and a few tbsp of water, to a thick, slightly coarse paste.
  • Heat oil in the pan.
  • Add asafoetida, mustard seeds,curry leaves and when the mustard pops, add tindora, turmeric, salt and sauté until it is cooked.
  • Add the ground masala and  jaggery  and cook until they all blend in together.
  • Serve hot with white rice and dal.
  • Sautéed Tindora (Ivy Gourd/kovakka) with Coconut and Tamarind


    2010
    03.21

    Finishing up with the last few bags of frozen veggies, and so it is going to be Tindora tonight. This mildly sweet, spicy and tangy dish used to be my sister S’ favorite. As a child I used to wonder why. But now I totally understand. I love it too. Strange how with age, your taste buds change too! :^).

    IMG_5883

    Ingredients

    1.5 lb Tindora/Ivy gourd cut into long thin slices
    1 cup fresh grated coconut 
    1 tbsp coriander seeds
    1/4 tsp turmeric powder
    1 tbsp split urad dal/ black gram
    1 tbsp tamarind paste or a lemon size ball of pitted tamarind
    3-4 dried red chilies
    1 tsp black mustard seeds
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    2 tbsp jaggery shavings
    a pinch of asafoetida
    salt to taste
    2 tbsp refined oil

    Directions

  • Heat 1 tsp of oil in a pan and roast the coriander seeds, urad dal and red chilies until the seeds turn brown and fragrant.
  • Grind coconut with the roasted mixture, salt, tamarind and a few tbsp of water, to a thick, slightly coarse paste.
  • Heat oil in the pan.
  • Add asafoetida, mustard seeds,curry leaves and when the mustard pops, add tindora, turmeric, salt and sauté until it is cooked.
  • Add the ground masala and  jaggery  and cook until they all blend in together.
  • Serve hot with white rice and dal.
  • Moong Dal with Beans, Stir-Fry


    2010
    03.21

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    Another one of those vegetables that I like frozen over fresh, is French cut green beans.  I like beans cooked best, the South Indian way and the French cut beans fits perfectly in all of these recipes.

    Frozen spinach, beans, ivy gourd, peas and carrots are always stocked in my freezer. These are my fall back vegetable when I run out of fresh ones in the refrigerator side. So, why am I clearing up my freezer, you ask? Becaaauuuse., hold on to your horses,.ahem ..ahem,  I will be going to India in a weeks time. Woo Hoo!! Ok, that is all the excitement I’m allowed to show for right now. This is how it works in my cards of superstitions – Never get excited before you do anything exciting, and always expect the worst, because you NEVER get what you expected! Well, if you don’t believe me, try it just once. I can assure you, if it wont be for my recipes you are coming back, it will certainly be for ‘life’s valuable lessons’, I so willingly impart and never seem to be in short of ;)!!

    So, beating the excitement and coming back to the beans, this is a nice way to add proteins to your vegetable sides. You just need to soak the dal for an hour or two before hand, to allow them to cook easily along side the veggies. You can use any firm vegetable in this recipe like cabbage, spinach, beetroot etc. They all taste great.

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    Ingredients

    1 lb Beans, chopped fine
    1/2 cup split moong dal/mung bean
    2 -3 Green chilies, chopped
    1 tsp black mustard seeds
    1 tsp channa dal/ bengal gram
    a pinch of asafoetida 
    2 sprigs of curry leaves 
    11/2 tbsp refined vegetable oil
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Soak moong dal in water for an hour.
  • Heat oil in a pan.
  • Add mustard seeds, channa dal, asafoetida, and curry leaves
  • When the mustard pops, and dal turns brown, add green chilies and sauté for 15 – 20 seconds.
  • Add the beans  and the dal, minus the water (since it contains a lot of water soluble  vitamins, don’t throw away the water, use it for cooking something else where ever water is required )
  • Sauté till the beans cook. Make sure you don’t over cook them. They will be a tender vibrant green color when cooked just right.
  • Add salt to taste.
  • Serve with white rice and sambar.
  • Palak Paneer (Saag Paneer)


    2010
    03.18

     

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    One of the veggies/greens, that I prefer using frozen over fresh, is spinach. I’d always heard food network’s chefs rave about why frozen spinach is better than fresh. But, since I’m a cynic of the ugliest order, I couldn’t but help do my own research. Evidently what those super cool chefs, whose incessant smiling and fresh make up, after having cooked up a three course meal (apparently, all by themselves * eyes rolling*) , annoys the crap out of you, have all along been telling the gospel truth. Documented studies have stated that spinach in the frozen form, tend to hold on to their nutrition more than the ones left at room temperature or in the refrigerator. It also states that, you tend to cook more (and thus consume more) quantity of spinach when they are chopped and frozen because their volume significantly reduces during the process. I always preferred using frozen only because it was lesser work and made absolutely no difference in taste, until I stumbled upon these studies. So now I’m convinced, and I restate, the lazier me always tends to provide healthier options for my family :D.

    Ingredients

    10 oz frozen spinach, defrosted  or 1 lb fresh spinach, chopped
    small bunch of mustard leaves, chopped (optional)
    1 small bunch fresh fenugreek leaves, chopped (optional)
    1 tbsp chopped fresh mint
    2 –3 tbsp chopped cilantro 
    1 med sized onion, chopped
    1-2 tomatoes, chopped
    2 tsp lemon juice
    1 tsp ginger-garlic paste
    1-2 green chilies (as per tolerance)
    14 oz of paneer 
    11/2tsp garam masala (I use my kashmiri masala because it has fennel in it and I love the taste of fennel with spinach. if you don’t have it, you can use the punjabi garam masala + 1/2 tsp of roasted crushed fennel seeds)
    1/4 tsp of turmeric powder
    1/2 tsp roasted ground cumin
    1/2 tsp coriander powder (optional)
    salt to taste
    3-4 tbsp of fresh cream or 2 dollops of  sour cream for garnish

    Directions

  • Cut the paneer into slabs (not cubes) and toast them on both sides in a non stick pan in 1 tbsp of oil. Make sure you don’t over do it. Both the sides should have just a slight hint of brown to bring out the nutty flavor of the paneer.
  • When all the slabs of paneer are toasted cut them up into small cubes, sprinkle a little salt and set aside.
  • Heat a tbsp of refined oil, add cumin sauté for a minute.
  • Add in the chopped onions, sauté till golden brown
  • Add ginger-garlic paste, chilies, turmeric, coriander, garam masala   and tomatoes and sauté till the oil comes clear.
  • Add all the greens and sauté till they cook.
  • Turn off the heat. Let it cool.
  • Grind the cooled mixture in a blender or food processor along with the mint and cilantro to a slightly coarse paste.
  • Pour the ground mixture back to the same skillet. Stir in the paneer cubes, lemon juice and let it boil for a couple of minutes till it all comes together.
  • Take off the flame. Garnish with fresh cream or sour cream
  • Serve hot with Indian Breads .
  • Caramelized Plantains with Malai Kulfi


    2010
    03.17

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    Ever since I moved to California seven years back, I haven’t got much chance to dress up. There has been an occasional office party here, or a friends anniversary dinner there. But never an actual opportunity that allows me to take out a heavy set gold jewelry from the bank, or drape myself into one of those resplendent gold embroidered Kanjeevarams, that I lugged in my bags all the way over the Pacific, flying to California as a new bride.

    So, a few months back when I decided to go ‘full monty’ with my hair, I thought I didn’t have much to lose. Who was going to see me, right? I sit in my pajamas the whole day while I work from home. And, as for my friends, they are sooo used to seeing me in jeans, frayed at the knees and ankles. For them, there is so much ON me to be ridiculed, that something absent would hardly be missed. It started with an intention of just trimming the ragged edges of my hair. The ‘trims’, wound up into big ‘chunks’ and I looked like an Egyptian slave bound to the servitude of a Pharo. I don’t know if it was age  catching up, or if it was the years of chemical torture I’ve put my hair through. It just refused to behave itself anymore. It moved with my head and did not seem to want to get a life of its own!!  So, frustrated, I decided to get rid of it all, hoping the new growth will come with an open new mind. Apparently NOT!! The new hair is as stubborn as the old one, if not more, and now I look like a Mallu-Dingo-Nurse-Aunty fresh off the boat from Dubai.

    The cheekiest consolation about my hair I’ve gotten so far – “Thank God, you have a good heart. People will learn to see that and ignore the hair.”

    And yes, as luck would have it, my dearest BIL, who so cherished his bachelorhood when my long silky tresses put Rapunzel to shame, has a fiancée now and a wedding date for next month. I know I couldn’t expect people to bring their lives to a grinding halt, just for my hair. But, my vanity compelled me to plead for a few extra months of grace, just until my hair could grow out and I could find alternatives to control it. After all, this was the kind of celebration I’d been waiting for over a decade. But, my dear BIL (who obviously shouldn’t be so dear anymore) politely refused. They evidently have plans that do not involve my hair! :’(!!  So, now I have to welcome the new bride into the family in my gold, fine silk and raggedy static spiked hair! So much for all the waiting!

    And like I do for all my woes, I looked towards sugar for help. That is one place I know I will never be turned down from. It won’t fix my hair, but, it really plays cool tricks with my mind. It takes me to a happy place where I can imagine everyone in delicate silks and clean shaven heads :D.

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    This delicious dessert is made simply by caramelizing sliced plantains using sugar and ghee (clarified butter). Though it takes about just a minute to make, the flavors are so intense and unparalleled. And as if this by itself wasn’t sinful enough, I thought bedecking it with a dollop of my high calorie Malai Kulfi would be dandy. And voila, what I have here, I guarantee, can take any one out from their deepest of depressions.

    Ingredients

    2 nicely ripened plantains
    2 – 3 tsp granulated sugar
    2 – 3 tsp ghee / clarified butter
    Malai Kulfi or any ice cream of your preference

    Directions

  • Slice the plantains vertically into 3 thin slices. If it is too big, cut it into half and then slice it vertical.
  • Heat ghee in a shallow pan at a low flame.
  • Sprinkle sugar on the slices and place it flat into the pan so that the side with the sugar touches the floor of the pan. Let it roast till it turns golden brown.
  • Sprinkle sugar on the side faced up and turn it over. Let it caramelize on that side too.
  • Serve hot by itself or with a dollop of Malai Kulfi or any ice cream of your choice. 
  • Aloo Bhaji and Puris / Spiced Potatoes with Fried Indian Bread


    2010
    03.16

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    Nish: Mama, whatcha doin?

    Me: I’m making Puris for you, baby.

    Nish: Poowwis? Why?

    Me: Because, Puris are your favorite.

    Nish: Mama, you making Poowwis with Macaroni and Cheese?

    Me: Yes, I am.

    Nish: Thaaeenks Mama, Macaroni aaend Cheese poowwis are my favorite!

    What can I say?  The apple doesn’t fall far from the tree? Like his Dad, Nish, will eat anything when he’s assured, what’s in it, is what he likes. Truth be told, my droll little man, likes Puris more than he does Mac and Cheese. But, prefers to believe other wise. Idlis, dosas, rotis are all his favorite when he is guaranteed, they are made form Mac and Cheese :). Oh, bless!!.

    Puri and Bhaji is to India, what Mac and Cheese is to America. A child’s delight and an adult’s I-Dont-Care-If-I-Die-Young food. Interestingly, in spite of all the diversity in the Indian sub continent, this combination of food is similar and popular through out the country.

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    Ingredients
     
    For the Puri
    1 cup whole wheat flour
    1/2 cup water
    1/4 tsp of salt
    refined oil for deep frying

    For the Bhaji
    4 medium sized Potatoes peeled and diced into chunks
    1 tsp ginger garlic paste
    2-3 Green chilies chopped
    1 med sized onion chopped
    1/4 tsp turmeric powder
    1/4 tsp cumin seeds (optional)
    1/2 tsp mustard seeds
    pinch of asafoetida
    1/2 tsp bengal gram/channa dal
    3-4 tbsp curd or 2 tsp lemon juice
    salt to taste
    2 tbsp cilantro chopped
    1 sprig curry leaves (optional)
    2 tbsp refined oil

    Directions

    For the Puri

  • Mix dough, salt and water, and knead well to make a smooth and firm dough
  • Cover with a damp cloth and let it rest for 30 – 45 minutes.
  • Take a tablespoon of dough (I prefer making small Puris) each time, mold it into a smooth ball and then roll it out into thin neat circles. Sprinkle flour or oil if the dough sticks while rolling it out.
  • Heat oil in a deep frying pan. To test the temperature, drop a pinch of dough into the oil, if the temperature is right if it rises up immediately. If it stays sunk below let the oil heat for some more time.
  • Drop in one rolled out circle of dough at each time. When the edges begin to fluff up, gently press the Puri down at the center into the oil with a skimmer, this makes it fluff up into a nice ball. Turn over. When the Puri acquires a very slight tinge of brown, remove and place on paper towels to blot out the excess oil
  • Serve hot with Chole or Aloo Bhaji
  •  

    For the Aloo Bhaji 

  • Heat oil in a pan.
  • Add asafoetida, cumin, mustard, channa dal and curry leaves.
  • When the mustard pops and the dal turns slightly brown, add onions and sauté until they are translucent and tender.
  • Add ginger garlic paste and sauté for another minute.
  • Add the potatoes, salt, turmeric, sauté for a minute or two.
  • Reduce the flame to medium low, close the pan and let the potatoes cook. Add water if needed for the cooking.
  • When the potatoes are cooked add curd (or lemon juice) and mix well for a minute or two.
  • Transfer to bowl, garnish with chopped cilantro.
  • Serve hot with Puris.
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    Whole Wheat Rum and Raisin Cake


    2010
    03.15

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    With all the baking I’ve been doing in the last couple of weeks, I declare – this cake is by far the best, to make with whole wheat. My best friend K, is going to love it for sure. Not only for the whole wheat, but also for the yummm dee dum pa RUM pum pum pum ;)!!

    Ingredients

    IMG_55822 cups whole wheat flour (I use the Pillsbury brand found in the Indian stores)
    1 1/4 cup butter
    3/4 cup dark rum
    3 eggs
    1/4 cup milk

    It is essential for the butter, milk and eggs to be at room temperature

    1 cup sugar
    2 heaped tsp baking powder
    5 -6 drops of good vanilla extract
    1/2 tsp of instant coffee powder
    1/2 tsp cocoa
    1/3 cup raisins
    1/3 cup cashew nuts chopped
    1/3 cup candied mixed fruit
    1/3 cup dried fig chopped (if you don’t have these, you can use pitted dates instead)
    1/2 tsp salt
    big pinch of nutmeg
    1/3 tsp cardamom cinnamon clove spice mix
    1 tsp orange zest
    2 – 3 tbsp sugar to caramelize

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    Directions

  • Soak the raisins, candied fruit and figs in rum, over night.
  • Caramelize 2 -3 spoons of sugar. When done, whisk in the milk, cocoa, coffee powder, nutmeg and spice mix  until smooth. Set aside to cool to room temp.
  • In a bowl, cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy. Beat in eggs one at time, add in the vanilla, and the caramel milk mixture
  • Add in the orange zest.
  • Sift together flour, baking powder and salt using a sieve.
  • Stir in the dry ingredients into the wet, a little at a time. Don’t over mix it
  • Mix the rum soaked fruits with the nuts and fold into the batter. Keep a little of the dry fruit and nut mixture aside to sprinkle on top (purely for aesthetics).
  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
  • Spread batter evenly in a greased pan, dusted with flour and bake for 45 minutes or until a tooth pick inserted comes out clean.
  • Allow to cool to a warm temp.
  • Serve immediately or wrap in aluminium foil when still warm (prevents drying) to store for later.
  • Chinese – An order of 2- Entrée Plate Coming Right up


    2010
    03.14

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    Ok, I’m being upfront in saying this -These are not Indo Chinese recipes (if that was what you were hoping for). Is it authentic Chinese? I’m afraid, not. The recipes are as Chinese as you think ‘Panda Express’ is ;).

    While dining out, for my family, the husband, the son and myself  included, good taste and some amount of hygiene is all that it takes, to float our boat.  We don’t care much for authenticity, snooty ambiances or high profile chefs. On the other hand, throw in some confusion, a harried waiter messing up with orders, a whining child there, a falling cutlery here,  and we’ll blend right in. Owe it to my thrifty Mallu blood, I hate to see good money go down the drain, and that, is exactly what I think happens at most of these supercilious restaurants. Their bite size portions, invariably leaves me eating a follow up dinner at home or, when fate is out bent on grudging me, I wind up to-going the insipid spread, and after having paid a couple of hundred dollar for a an ounce of salmon or crab, I’m back to square one, behind the apron, altering the packed meals to fit our tastes.
    In comparison, this bourgeois American-Chinese chain, though might not have lofty sounding names on their menu, has always managed to provide hearty satisfying meals for my family, every time we’ve eaten at the food court, while shopping at the local mall. I accept, the food is slightly on the greasier side than I would like (the only reason, I try making them myself). But, I find the taste awesome. So, whenever I have lots of veggies in the fridge and when there is very little time to cook, I invariably try to imitate Panda express at home.

    Stir-Fried Mushrooms and Asparagus in Chili Garlic Sauce

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     The best way to use up left over vegetables that don’t need much cooking time, is to make a stir-fry out of them. You can use any combination of vegetables you like. .[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

    Ginger Sesame Shrimp with Snow Peas

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    The vibrant colors of fresh vegetables never fail to excite me.  I always try to pick a couple of  bright colored vegetables while I grocery shop..[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Chinese Egg Fried Rice

    IMG_5516The trick to getting fried rice to smell and taste like the ‘Chinese’ kind, is to add the rice when the eggs are 1/2 done..[read more]