Archive for July, 2010

Chenda Kappa and Mulagu Chammanthi/ Boiled Tapioca with Green Chili Chutney – Kerala Style


2010
07.28

IMG_7666

Whoever said life’s finer pleasures are in simple things couldn’t be more right. And when the adage is applied to food I would bold, underline and increase it to the biggest font possible. There are foods that I could eat anytime of the day and everyday if it were allowed.  And this, is one of them. The green chili chutney is what does it for me. As a child my mother served this chutney with all forms of boiled or steamed roots and tubers like sweet potatoes, yams, tapioca etc. And that was when I think I inherited my love for the sweet tangy and spicy combos.

Note: You cannot replace shallots with onions in this recipe as it takes the taste to a whole different direction.

Green chili Chutney

Ingredients

10 shallots roughly chopped
10 hot green chilies roughly chopped
1/4 tsp of tamarind paste
1 tbsp coconut oil
salt to taste
1  curry leaf

Directions

  • Grind shallots, green chilies, tamarind and curry leaf to a coarse mixture with a chunky texture.
  • Drizzle with coconut oil and mix well.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve with hot kappa or yams.

    Cooking Instructions for Tapioca

    Depending on the quality of the tapioca the cooking time varies. So it is safer to cook this in an open pan with salted boiling water rather than a pressure cooker. This allows you to check on it with a fork in regular intervals. Cooked tapioca should be soft and tender right through.

  • Chenda Kappa and Mulagu Chammanthi/ Boiled Tapioca with Green Chili Chutney – Kerala Style


    2010
    07.28

    IMG_7666

    Whoever said life’s finer pleasures are in simple things couldn’t be more right. And when the adage is applied to food I would bold, underline and increase it to the biggest font possible. There are foods that I could eat anytime of the day and everyday if it were allowed.  And this, is one of them. The green chili chutney is what does it for me. As a child my mother served this chutney with all forms of boiled or steamed roots and tubers like sweet potatoes, yams, tapioca etc. And that was when I think I inherited my love for the sweet tangy and spicy combos.

    Note: You cannot replace shallots with onions in this recipe as it takes the taste to a whole different direction.

    Green chili Chutney

    Ingredients

    10 shallots roughly chopped
    10 hot green chilies roughly chopped
    1/4 tsp of tamarind paste
    1 tbsp coconut oil
    salt to taste
    1  curry leaf

    Directions

  • Grind shallots, green chilies, tamarind and curry leaf to a coarse mixture with a chunky texture.
  • Drizzle with coconut oil and mix well.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve with hot kappa or yams.

    Cooking Instructions for Tapioca

    Depending on the quality of the tapioca the cooking time varies. So it is safer to cook this in an open pan with salted boiling water rather than a pressure cooker. This allows you to check on it with a fork in regular intervals. Cooked tapioca should be soft and tender right through.

  • Meen Molee / Halibut in Spicy Coconut Gravy


    2010
    07.20

    IMG_7690

    So, what do you think of my new bootylicious sexy acquisition from India? I can’t describe what joy it has been to cook in it. I have 4 of these meen chettis. One specially reserved for the meen curries, another for the thorans and mezuhuveratis and the remaining two will act as stand bys. That’s the only way I can keep my chettis from harms way. Oh, don’t sneer. That’s how things work in this cosmic world of providence! If you have a back up, nothing can/will go wrong. If you DON’T, things can go spiraling out of control. In this case, I can be sure to wake up, and find my chettis victims of a bizarre earthquake, with the epicenter  right under their butts. Leer and snicker all you want people, but I’m telling you, when it comes to fate, no-siree, uh-uh, I’m not taking my chances.
    I shall reserve my findings of Karma and the workings of the mystical world  for another day or may be another site. What do you suggest? Do you think  people coming here would be interested in more than food and care two hoots about where their rear ends would eventually rest? And,  I digress (again!).

    So, the Meen Molee is Kerala’s answer for a sea food dish that goes well with Indian flat breads. While I’m a huge fan of the traditional fish curry with the kudam pulli in it, I’m really not much into this dish. But, Roy and Nish could lick bowls of this clean! And since we’ve made the transition from (slurp slurp) rice to rotis for dinner, they’ve been lucky, as I’ve had to make more of this kind.
    My suggestion while making this would be to use less fishy fishes or, to use fillets where you don’t need to deal with the skin. Again, IMO only. I’ve used halibut here. But you could use anything like salmon, cod, tilapia fillets etc.

    IMG_7643

     Ingredients
    1 lb skinless fillets of Halibut cut into one serving size pieces
    1 medium red onion finely sliced
    2 –3 green chilies slit into two
    1 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
    1 large tomato cut into large chunks
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    1/2 tsp coriander powder
    1/2 tsp black pepper powder
    1/2 tsp kerala garam masala
    1 tsp red chili powder
    1 cup thick coconut milk from a can (if you are using fresh coconut milk, use all the milk extracted from 1 small coconut, keep the thick and the thin milk separate)
    3 tbsp lemon juice 
    2 tbsp coconut oil
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1/2 tsp powdered roasted fenugreek seeds
    1-2 sprigs of curry leaves
    2- 3 shallots finely sliced
    Salt – to taste

     Directions

  • Marinate the fish fillets with lemon juice, salt, black pepper and refrigerate for 2 hours.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of oil in a pan, add powdered fenugreek and sauté for 30 secs.
  • Add sliced onions and sauté until golden brown.
  • Add ginger-garlic paste and sauté for another minute.
  • Add green chilies,tomatoes, turmeric, coriander, chili powder, garam masala, salt and sauté well until the tomatoes form a mush.
  • Add one cup of water if you are using canned milk or one cup of thin coconut milk if you are using fresh milk.
  • When the coconut milk/water  comes to boil, add the fish fillets and cook covered on medium flame for 10 minutes or till the gravy starts to thicken.
  • Pour 1 cup of thick coconut milk and simmer for another 3-4 minutes.
  • Heat the remaining oil in a pan, add in mustard seeds, when they pop, add the curry leaves and shallots.
  • Sauté until the shallots are nicely fired.
  • Pour the seasoning over the curry, mix gently and switch off the flame.
  • Parippu Cheera Curry / Lentils with Greens (Amaranth Leaves)


    2010
    07.19

    The earliest memory I have of these red and green Amaranth are from my Mom’s vegetable garden, where they grew like wild weeds. As a child I often squinted at them from a distance, pretending  they were rubies and emeralds strewn around my palace during my make believe games of an Empress and her empire. Every time my Mom went on a spree of de-weeding we had Amaranth for lunch and my empire turned poor over night :(.

    Having come from the South of India where we ate some sort of greens every other day, the vegetable market in the US was a little disappointing to me initially. Other than spinach, a few other greens I found, I was not familiar with and had no clue how to cook them. The local Indian stores didn’t carry much either. They had the same spinach and sometimes the seasonal methi(fenugreek leaves) and the mustard leaves.  So when I discovered the Asian market that had ever so many varieties of greens all through the year, tons of them that I recognized and tons more that looked possible to cook with, I was Jubilant. And like I always do when I get excited I went overboard and bought so much of it that it took my flat mates and I several weeks before we could finish all that I’d purchased. Thank God for freezers, we didn’t have to trash any of it,  we chopped them and saved them in these cool life savers (literally huh??). For several weeks we looked green, talked green, yawned green, farted green and pooped green. You get the drift? But surprisingly we never tired of it.   After several weeks,  when we had managed to run through all that I’d bought, we went back and got more. Though obviously unlike the first over indulgent buy, I did hold myself back and bought just enough to last us a week. But the point is, in spite of the all those weeks of eating only greens we didn’t mind more. I guess that’s what is special about greens. They are so refreshingly tasty and healthy that your body just can’t seem to get enough of it!

    IMG_7605

    My local Chinese market carries Amaranth all year round. So these are my fall back greens when I can’t find anything else I like. They are easy to cook with and blend quietly into any dish like spinach does. I mostly cook them with Mung dal in the traditional mallu style but they taste great with eggs and also when simply sautéed with coconut in a thoran style.

    Ingredients
    2 cup chopped Amaranth
    3/4  cup mung dal
    1/2 cup grated coconut
    4 finely sliced shallots
    1/2 tsp roasted cumin powder
    1/2 tsp of chopped garlic
    1/2 cup chopped red onions
    1/4 tsp chili powder-1/4tsp
    1/4tsp turmeric powder
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    2 green chilies
    2 dried red chilies
    Salt to taste
    1 tbsp coconut oil
    1 tbsp ghee
    1 sprig of curry leaves

    Directions

  • Grind coconut, half the shallots, green chilies, cumin and 2 curry leaves to a coarse paste and keep aside.
  • Pressure cook dal, greens, turmeric powder and chili powder in 2cups of water.
  • Heat coconut oil in a pan and add 1/2 of the mustard seeds.
  • When they pop add the dried red chilies, onions, garlic and sauté until onions are translucent.
  • Add the cooked dal and greens to this and mix in the ground coconut mixture.
  • Add water to get the desired consistency and add salt to taste.
  • Mix well and bring to boil.
  • Heat ghee in a seasoning pan, add the remaining mustard and when they pop, add in the remaining shallots and curry leaves.
  • Fry the shallots until they are deep brown.
  • Turn off the flame and pour the seasoning over the dal.
  • Stir in the seasoning and turn off the flame.
  • Serve with rice, pickles and papadam.
  • Methi / Fenugreek Parathas


    2010
    07.15

    IMG_7539 

    Ever since I came back from India having been thoroughly brain washed by my Doctor and health freak sister, Sony, I’ve been working hard to reduce the waist lines of my family – husband, son and yours truly. We’ve completely moved away from our most favorite, slurp slurp rice (sorry I can’t say it without doing that a couple of times) to whole wheat rotis for dinner.  The transition hasn’t been difficult like I expected though. On the contrary, I’ve been plotting on bringing the same change to lunch as well. Here’s why- When it comes to rice (slurp slurp), I usually have to make at least 3 dishes to go with it. A dal or the like that has some sort of gravy to wash the rice down, a side of sautéed vegetables(you can’t do without vegetables right?) and a piece of fish or meat to satiate the mallu carnivores in us. But with rotis surprisingly, just one dish does it for us!!! It has been saving me a hell lot of time and the lazy me couldn’t be more happy.

    If rotis had me making just one side, imagine my joy when parathas asked for none ;)!!!!  Now you know what my boys have been eating a lot of lately!! All I need to do now is figure out an attractive way to talk about the change in menu for their lunches as well ;)!

     IMG_7548_2

    Methi parathas which according to me are the healthiest of all parathas because of all the greens that go into them, are also (according to me) the tastiest of the lot. Many like to make a masala of the methi by cooking them with onions and spices before rolling them into parathas. But I don’t. I seriously think it is sinful to overpower the taste of these fine leaves with the spices and kill their nutrition with all the cooking.  People – it is JUST my opinion. Please aim your shadoobies else where. …I simply knead my methi in their immaculate form, directly into the dough with a little bit of amchoor (for the tang) and what I get out of them – I totally totally  LOVE!

    Ingredients
    2 cups whole wheat flour
    ½ cup besan/gram flour (Optional. I don’t add this, cause I don’t like it. My mother does though. Replace with ½ cup wheat flour if you don’t do besan like me)
    2 cups fenugreek leaves chopped fine 
    1 tbsp refined vegetable oil
    ½ tsp. red chili powder
    1 tsp roasted cumin powder
    1 tsp amchoor/dry mango powder
    ½ tsp turmeric powder
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Mix all the ingredients in a bowl and knead it into into a soft smooth dough adding water, a little at a time.
  • Set aside covered for an hour.
  • Divide the dough into 12 equal parts each and make smooth balls out of them
  • Pat the stuffed balls with dry flour before beginning to roll them out
  • Roll out the balls into circles using a rolling pin and  to the thickness you desire. I like mine very thin..
  • Heat a skillet on high.
  • Place the paratha over the skillet.
  • When the paratha begins to puff up on the edges turn it over.
  • Repeat.
  • Apply 1/2 – 1 tsp of ghee to the surface when you notice brown spots and turn over.
  • Press down using a spatula and apply ghee similarly on this side too.
  • Take off the flame when cooked thoroughly on both sides.
  • Serve hot with, curd, pickles or butter.
  • Bagalabhath – Seasoned Curd Rice


    2010
    07.15

    IMG_7564

    My mother insists that every grand child of hers eat a small bowl of curd rice during at least one of the meals in a day. Apparently she’s heard it through the grapevine that it is the quintessential food for developing young brains. And the best part, listen to this – you can’t have the rice and the yogurt on their own. For it to work right, it has to be a combination of the two *eyes rolling*. Anyway I simply abide because, like I’ve said before, I don’t have any moral fiber left in me to face her wrath and scorn if I question her. Also, I’ve come to love this dish because, trust me, I was made to eat quite a number of these bowls through out my life time – by you know whom!! Look how bright and intelligent those bowls have made me ;)!

    Jokes apart, this is actually quite a refreshing treat on a hot summers day! With a little bit of grated carrots and ginger to bite into, some crushed nuts for the crunch and some fresh cilantro to add color this truly is a delicate eye and a palette pleaser. 

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup well /over cooked slightly warm white rice
    1 cup thick curd
    1 tsp fresh seedless arils of pomegranate
    1 tbsp grated carrot
    1/4 tsp grated ginger
    1 tbsp grated cucumber
    1/4 tsp finely chopped green chilies
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1 tsp cold pressed sesame oil
    1 tsp chopped cashew nuts
    1 tsp chopped cilantro
    4-5 curry leaves
    salt to taste
    2 dried whole red chilies

    Directions

  • Fluff the rice with a fork and whip the curd separately.
  • Mix well the rice, curd and ginger and add salt to taste.
  • Now mix the curd and ginger with this paste.
  • Heat the sesame oil, once the oil is hot add mustard seeds,when it pops add the red chilies, green chilies, cashew nuts and curry leaves and sauté for a minute.
  • Turn off the flame and pour the seasoning over the curd and rice mixture.
  • Garnish with cilantro, carrots, cucumber and pomegranate.
  • Serve with spicy Indian pickles or wafers
  • Bagalabhath – Seasoned Curd Rice


    2010
    07.15

    IMG_7564

    My mother insists that every grand child of hers eat a small bowl of curd rice during at least one of the meals in a day. Apparently she’s heard it through the grapevine that it is the quintessential food for developing young brains. And the best part, listen to this – you can’t have the rice and the yogurt on their own. For it to work right, it has to be a combination of the two *eyes rolling*. Anyway I simply abide because, like I’ve said before, I don’t have any moral fiber left in me to face her wrath and scorn if I question her. Also, I’ve come to love this dish because, trust me, I was made to eat quite a number of these bowls through out my life time – by you know whom!! Look how bright and intelligent those bowls have made me ;)!

    Jokes apart, this is actually quite a refreshing treat on a hot summers day! With a little bit of grated carrots and ginger to bite into, some crushed nuts for the crunch and some fresh cilantro to add color this truly is a delicate eye and a palette pleaser. 

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup well /over cooked slightly warm white rice
    1 cup thick curd
    1 tsp fresh seedless arils of pomegranate
    1 tbsp grated carrot
    1/4 tsp grated ginger
    1 tbsp grated cucumber
    1/4 tsp finely chopped green chilies
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1 tsp cold pressed sesame oil
    1 tsp chopped cashew nuts
    1 tsp chopped cilantro
    4-5 curry leaves
    salt to taste
    2 dried whole red chilies

    Directions

  • Fluff the rice with a fork and whip the curd separately.
  • Mix well the rice, curd and ginger and add salt to taste.
  • Now mix the curd and ginger with this paste.
  • Heat the sesame oil, once the oil is hot add mustard seeds,when it pops add the red chilies, green chilies, cashew nuts and curry leaves and sauté for a minute.
  • Turn off the flame and pour the seasoning over the curd and rice mixture.
  • Garnish with cilantro, carrots, cucumber and pomegranate.
  • Serve with spicy Indian pickles or wafers
  • Mooli / mullangi / Radish Sambar


    2010
    07.08

    IMG_7463

    A very long time ago, my folks converted some extra space into an independent house and rented it out to a young couple and their 6 month old baby boy. Little did they know then that this family would influence their 4 young girls (3 daughters and a niece) in the most unexpected manner and leave an unusually lasting impression on them for the rest of their lives.

    The young R couple moved in with very little baggage and a baby that looked as beautiful as the moon.  I was less than 4 years old then. And as my mother showed them around, I timidly hid between the pleats of her sari and gawped wide eyed at the good looking family. Auntie R with her fair milky white skin, silky auburn hair and spellbinding beauty could  easily pass for a movie star. Uncle R carried his chiseled features and tall personality with such refined grace that I felt certain he was a super model. Baby R gurgled in his mothers arms, tugging at my heart strings for he looked exactly like the blond, blue eyed doll I often longed for. They settled in decorating the place with their fine taste. Just into their twenties, about over a year into their marriage, the couple were deep in love and behaved like newly weds. Their open displays of affection often amused us 4 (obviously, we’d never seen anything like this before, our parents being the – no touch, no hugs and absolutely no kissing kinds). At times we overheard them singing bollywood love ballads to each other and we giggled amongst ourselves, pretending to be entertained by their silliness, but secretly reveling in the romance of it all.  We embraced the refreshing excitement that had come about our otherwise prosaic being.

    IMG_7465[1]

    In the years that followed, though raucously different from us, the Rs formed an integral part of our family. Baby R who grew up and blended into our all girls team with ease, sought in us the companionship of siblings he never had. When uncle R’s Royal Enfield Bullet thundered through the colony, flaunting his voguish grin as he nodded at us in recognition, we girls gleamed smug at our playmates. Such class was unheard of in our bourgeoisie neighborhood and to be associated with him gave us great pride. And auntie R, she was a whole different story. An eye-opener to the exciting world of the adults, she was our first grown up friend. We girls, every so often hung around her while she cooked and went about her daily routine engaging us with detailed and glorified tales of her childhood, wild teenage years, family gossip, movies, parties she’d been to etc etc.. Name it and she could and would talk to us about it. The age difference, never a problem. The young impressionable girls that we were, we often reached to her for advice about grooming and clothes. And since our folks could (would?) afford only the inexpensive kind and though we knew well that they didn’t come anywhere near her tastes, we still scurried to her and she gave us unprejudiced advice and approval. We often joined her while she shopped in the upscale parts of the town and the best part of these trysts were the elaborate treats that came after – Decadent food in some of the finest restaurants of Bangalore. Life was good and the Rs added to the marvel.

    After having witnessed more than a decade of this frolic, when we girls were well into our teens, we had to watch helpless and bewildered the house of cards collapse as Uncle R’s business went under. Their earlier extravagant lifestyle had left them with nothing to fall back on. My parents whom I’d always been embarrassed about for their frugality and thrifty lifestyle, rose to the occasion and for their part, let the R’s continue to board, rent free. I think they secretly helped with the groceries too. Nothing was said in the open. But we understood. A couple of years later when nothing seemed to work, the R’s  moved to a different part of town to live in with their parents. They left leaving a big gaping hole in the lives of us 4.

    The R’s are doing fine today, Baby R is a successful professional, married and settled. But often, when I look back to those days, though they were mostly sunny and happy, it is the last two years of distress that really clamors in my memory. Plan for the future, that is where you are going to spend the rest of your life, I’d often heard my parents say. And after what the R’s taught me, I couldn’t agree with them more.

    This morning as I cut the radish for the sambar, I couldn’t help but remember auntie R. Apart from the many other things that impressed me about her, her unparalleled cooking was at the top. When I sat whining at the table, as a kid, refusing to eat my mom’s food, a bowl of sambar from auntie R’s would have my plate wiped out in no time. Yes, I miss the Rs dearly today. But I’m glad they are all fine.

    No, the recipe for the sambar powder is not from auntie R. It’s from my friend Deepthi, whose Rasam recipe I’d posted earlier here. And from what I can remember this comes close enough!

    Sambar Spice Mix (Sambar powder)

    If you want to make a bigger quantity of the mix to last for later, follow these proportions

    1/2 cup urad dal 
    1/2 cup chana dal 
    2 tbsp cumin seeds 
    3 tbsp pepper corns
    2 tsp fenugreek seeds  
    2 tsp poppy seeds 
    1 cup coriander seeds
    1 cup desiccated coconut / copra
    1/2 tbsp pepper corns 
    1 tsp of cinnamon clove spice mix 
    4 tbsp chili powder 
    4 tbsp paprika (key ingredient that gives the rich red color)
    3 – 4 sprigs of  curry leaves

    The following proportions can be used if you want to make fresh spice mix on the fly

    1/4 tsp poppy seeds1 tbsp coriander seeds
    1/2 tbsp urad dal
    1/2 tbsp channa dal
    1/2 tsp cumin seeds
    1 tbsp desiccated coconut / copra
    1/4 tsp poppy seeds
    1/2 tbsp pepper corns
    1/5  tsp fenugreek seeds 
    1 tbsp coriander seeds
    big pinch of cinnamon clove spice mix
    1 tsp chili powder
    1 tsp paprika (key ingredient that gives the rich red color)
    3 – 4  curry leaves

    Directions

    Dry roast all the ingredients individually (except the cinnamon clove spice mix and chili powders), grind all the ingredients together to a smooth powder. If you are making the bulk quantity, store it in an air tight container to use later.

    Radish Sambar

    I’m not a big fan of adding multiple vegetable while making sambar. I think adding a single vegetable at a time gives a distinct and unique taste to each kind of sambar you make. My most favorite is the radish sambar. I love okra (bhindi), egg plant  and cucumber sambars too. But given a choice  between the four I always choose radish any day.

     Ingredients

    2 cups of white radish sliced
    1 onion or 8-10 shallots chopped fine
    1 cup tuvar dal/ lentils (pigeon pea)
    2 plump and ripe tomatoes chopped
    11/2 tsp rasam powder (or however much spicy you want the rasam to be)
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1/2 tsp cumin seeds
    1/2 tsp turmeric
    5- 6 curry leaves
    a pinch of asafoetida
    1/2 tsp tamarind paste or 1 lemon sized ball of pitted tamarind soaked in warm water and pulp extracted
    1 – 2 tsp jaggery shavings
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro (optional)
    2 tbsp clarified butter /ghee
    water
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Pressure cook dal with 2 cups water, tamarind extract, turmeric, tomatoes and radish and keep aside.
  • Heat oil or ghee in a pan, add asafoetida mustard and when they pop add curry leaves and onions and sauté until the onions are translucent.
  • Add the cooked dal and vegetables and mix well
  • Add sambar powder, jaggery, salt and add more water to get desired consistency and bring it to boil. Put off the flame.
  • Garnish with cilantro (optional)
  • Optionally

  • Heat a little ghee in a small pan and add a pinch of asafoetida, 1/4 tsp of mustard, 1/4 tsp of cumin and 5 –6 curry leaves.
  • When the mustard pops, switch off the flame and  pour the seasoning over the  Sambar to increase the flavor.
  • Stuffed Ridge Gourd Masala – North Karnataka Style


    2010
    07.08

    IMG_7496

    Ok, I had to revisit this post only because I have a huge confession to make. Frankly, when Shilpa gave me the recipe for this wonderful dish that I had at her place I was pretty certain she had forgotten some key ingredient. It tasted so amazing that when she listed out what went in it, I was like  Umm—err are you sure?? That’s it??!! I mean where are the spices? Where does that kick come from?  Ok, agreed. Half of these words I couldn’t get out. I didn’t have enough mettle to irritate her further. She already was sufficiently annoyed at my constant pounding and unnecessary urgency (yes, that’s how she described it) in my calls for the recipes. So, I had to swallow my reservations and publish them in spite of all my doubts (and people call me the bully!!*eyes rolling*).

    But this morning when I made this dish, I had to mercilessly hammer the doubting Thomas in me (he totally deserved it!).  Never before have I been so satisfied with any dish I’ve tried for the first time! It was lip smacking delicious! And who better to certify that it had passed all the tests -My three year old who said –I liked the Begetavals, Mama. Can I have more? 

    Thanks Shilpa! In-spite of all my doubts I knew I could rely on you ;)! Now, when can I have my avarekaalu recipes????? 😀

    IMG_3288

     

    This dish is similar to the Dharwad style Stuffed Brinjal Masala popularly called Badne Ennegayi. The only difference here is the use of Ridge Gourd instead of Brinjal (Eggplant). This dish pairs amazingly well with rotis. And if you are into the hot and sour thingy, you would stop looking, after a spoon of this.

    Ingredients
    2 cups ridge gourd, peeled, cut into 1.5 inches length. 
    1/2 cup onion finely sliced
    1/2 tsp tamarind paste
    1 tsp jaggery (or to taste, I like to add more)
    1 tsp chopped garlic
    1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
    1/2 cup toasted peanuts
    1 tsp chili powder
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro
    2 tbsp oil
    salt to taste

    IMG_7502

     Directions

  • Cut the cylindrical pieces of the Ridge gourd along the length into half, so that each piece forms a cup to hold the masala.
  • Shallow fry the pieces until slightly tender in 1 tbsp of oil and keep aside.
  • In the same oil sauté the onions until translucent.
  • Add garlic, toasted peanuts, coconut, chili powder and saute for a minute.
  • Grind this along all other ingredients (except the ridge gourd and oil) to a coarse paste. 
  • Stuff the ground masala into each piece of ridge gourd.
  • Heat the remaining oil in the pan and place each stuffed piece of veggie into it.
  • Add little water and let it cook until the veggies are done,
  • Serve hot with rotis.
  • Stuffed Ridge Gourd Masala – North Karnataka Style


    2010
    07.08

    IMG_7496

    Ok, I had to revisit this post only because I have a huge confession to make. Frankly, when Shilpa gave me the recipe for this wonderful dish that I had at her place I was pretty certain she had forgotten some key ingredient. It tasted so amazing that when she listed out what went in it, I was like  Umm—err are you sure?? That’s it??!! I mean where are the spices? Where does that kick come from?  Ok, agreed. Half of these words I couldn’t get out. I didn’t have enough mettle to irritate her further. She already was sufficiently annoyed at my constant pounding and unnecessary urgency (yes, that’s how she described it) in my calls for the recipes. So, I had to swallow my reservations and publish them in spite of all my doubts (and people call me the bully!!*eyes rolling*).

    But this morning when I made this dish, I had to mercilessly hammer the doubting Thomas in me (he totally deserved it!).  Never before have I been so satisfied with any dish I’ve tried for the first time! It was lip smacking delicious! And who better to certify that it had passed all the tests -My three year old who said –I liked the Begetavals, Mama. Can I have more? 

    Thanks Shilpa! In-spite of all my doubts I knew I could rely on you ;)! Now, when can I have my avarekaalu recipes????? 😀

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    This dish is similar to the Dharwad style Stuffed Brinjal Masala popularly called Badne Ennegayi. The only difference here is the use of Ridge Gourd instead of Brinjal (Eggplant). This dish pairs amazingly well with rotis. And if you are into the hot and sour thingy, you would stop looking, after a spoon of this.

    Ingredients
    2 cups ridge gourd, peeled, cut into 1.5 inches length. 
    1/2 cup onion finely sliced
    1/2 tsp tamarind paste
    1 tsp jaggery (or to taste, I like to add more)
    1 tsp chopped garlic
    1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
    1/2 cup toasted peanuts
    1 tsp chili powder
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro
    2 tbsp oil
    salt to taste

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     Directions

  • Cut the cylindrical pieces of the Ridge gourd along the length into half, so that each piece forms a cup to hold the masala.
  • Shallow fry the pieces until slightly tender in 1 tbsp of oil and keep aside.
  • In the same oil sauté the onions until translucent.
  • Add garlic, toasted peanuts, coconut, chili powder and saute for a minute.
  • Grind this along all other ingredients (except the ridge gourd and oil) to a coarse paste. 
  • Stuff the ground masala into each piece of ridge gourd.
  • Heat the remaining oil in the pan and place each stuffed piece of veggie into it.
  • Add little water and let it cook until the veggies are done,
  • Serve hot with rotis.