Archive for the ‘Pickles’ Category

BitterMelon-Carrot-Mango pickle / Pavakka Carrot Manga Achar – Kerala Style (Ready to Eat)


2010
06.12

IMG_3237 

This is my Mom’s all famous  mixed pickle recipe. It comes together fairly quickly and is one of my favorites. Like all mothers do, my Mom too eyeballs all her ingredients while cooking. So the proportions I’ve mentioned might not be as accurate. You may have to alter  them according to your tastes.

Ingredients
1 cup cut julienne style bitter melon
½ cup cut julienne style carrot
½ cup cut julienne style raw peeled mango
2 tsp cut julienne style garlic
2 tsp cut julienne style green chilies 
1 tbsp salt (or to taste) 
big pinch of asafoetida 
½  tsp roasted cumin powder (dry roast cumin seeds and powder them)  
½  tsp black mustard seeds
½ tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
2 –3 tbsp sesame or refined vegetable oil
2 sprigs of curry leaves
1/4 cup natural vinegar

Directions

  • Heat oil in a pan, sauté melons, carrots and mango, one at a time, for a few minutes each until they are just tender. Make sure not to cook them.
  • Drain them out of the oil and set aside.
  • In the same oil add asafoetida and mustard and when the mustard pops, add cumin, curry leaves, fenugreek, ginger, garlic, green chilies and sauté for a couple of minutes.
  • Reduce the heat and add the sautéed veggies, salt and vinegar and mix thoroughly on very low heat.
  • Turn off the heat and let it cool.
  • Serve immediately or refrigerate in air tight containers.
  • BitterMelon-Carrot-Mango pickle / Pavakka Carrot Manga Achar – Kerala Style (Ready to Eat)


    2010
    06.12

    IMG_3237 

    This is my Mom’s all famous  mixed pickle recipe. It comes together fairly quickly and is one of my favorites. Like all mothers do, my Mom too eyeballs all her ingredients while cooking. So the proportions I’ve mentioned might not be as accurate. You may have to alter  them according to your tastes.

    Ingredients
    1 cup cut julienne style bitter melon
    ½ cup cut julienne style carrot
    ½ cup cut julienne style raw peeled mango
    2 tsp cut julienne style garlic
    2 tsp cut julienne style green chilies 
    1 tbsp salt (or to taste) 
    big pinch of asafoetida 
    ½  tsp roasted cumin powder (dry roast cumin seeds and powder them)  
    ½  tsp black mustard seeds
    ½ tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
    2 –3 tbsp sesame or refined vegetable oil
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    1/4 cup natural vinegar

    Directions

  • Heat oil in a pan, sauté melons, carrots and mango, one at a time, for a few minutes each until they are just tender. Make sure not to cook them.
  • Drain them out of the oil and set aside.
  • In the same oil add asafoetida and mustard and when the mustard pops, add cumin, curry leaves, fenugreek, ginger, garlic, green chilies and sauté for a couple of minutes.
  • Reduce the heat and add the sautéed veggies, salt and vinegar and mix thoroughly on very low heat.
  • Turn off the heat and let it cool.
  • Serve immediately or refrigerate in air tight containers.
  • Kadugu Manga – Fresh Mango Pickles


    2010
    05.18

    The best thing about these Pickles are that, they can be eaten immediately and contain no preservatives. They come together in very little time and have a good shelf life when refrigerated. They taste best and last longer when made with really sour mangoes.

    IMG_7317

    Ingredients
    2 cups of mango diced small 
    2 tbsp red chili powder
    1 tsp cut julienne style ginger
    1 tsp cut julienne style garlic
    1 tbsp salt 
    big pinch of asafoetida 
    ½  tsp turmeric powder
    ½  tsp black mustard seeds
    ½ tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
    2 tbsp sesame or refined vegetable oil
    2 sprigs of curry leaves

    Directions

  • Heat oil in a pan, add asafoetida and mustard and when the mustard pops, add curry leaves, fenugreek,ginger, garlic and sauté for a couple of minutes.
  • Reduce the heat and add chili powder and stir fry for another couple of minutes on very low heat.
  • Turn off the heat, add salt and let the mixture cool.
  • When cool, add this mixture to the raw mangoes and mix thoroughly. 
  • Serve immediately or refrigerate in air tight containers.

  • Kadugu Manga – Fresh Mango Pickles


    2010
    05.18

    The best thing about these Pickles are that, they can be eaten immediately and contain no preservatives. They come together in very little time and have a good shelf life when refrigerated. They taste best and last longer when made with really sour mangoes.

    IMG_7317

    Ingredients
    2 cups of mango diced small 
    2 tbsp red chili powder
    1 tsp cut julienne style ginger
    1 tsp cut julienne style garlic
    1 tbsp salt 
    big pinch of asafoetida 
    ½  tsp turmeric powder
    ½  tsp black mustard seeds
    ½ tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
    2 tbsp sesame or refined vegetable oil
    2 sprigs of curry leaves

    Directions

  • Heat oil in a pan, add asafoetida and mustard and when the mustard pops, add curry leaves, fenugreek,ginger, garlic and sauté for a couple of minutes.
  • Reduce the heat and add chili powder and stir fry for another couple of minutes on very low heat.
  • Turn off the heat, add salt and let the mixture cool.
  • When cool, add this mixture to the raw mangoes and mix thoroughly. 
  • Serve immediately or refrigerate in air tight containers.

  • Tickle Your Palate With Some Pickle


    2010
    01.13

    IMG_4057_2

    My Godmother Auntie M,  is my Mom’s biggest rival in the kitchen, second only to my   Grandmother (Dad’s Mother, Mom’s mom-in-law of course ;)). Auntie M is what I would call a ‘Joy in the kitchen’.  She is a big girl (hard not to be when you cook like that) and has a sense of humor to match her size. With non stop witty chatter she cooks with ease and effortlessly sprawls out such scrumptious meals that, no invitations for dining are turned down at my God Parents. One of the treats that I fondly remember on her dining table from my childhood were the assortment of  Kerala pickles she often served. She was notorious for pickling anything and everything that grew or moved. And my Godfather Uncle G, often teasingly warned us naughty kids to mind our fingers and toes lest they end up in one of her pickle jars :D.

    This post is dedicated to Auntie M from whom I learnt two wonderful things. 1-Kitchen could be fun and not just work. 2- It just takes a simple jar of home made pickles to turn an ordinary Indian meal into an extraordinary one.

    Indian pickles unlike pickles form most other parts of the world,  apart from oil and salt use lots of flavorful spices in their marinade. These are not just for preserving seasonal food for non seasonal times but, with their powerful flavors form an integral part of the Indian cuisine.

    Pickled Shrimp – Kerala Style

    shrimp2

    Among many other things, Kerala cuisine is popular for its lip-smacking zesty meat and seafood pickles. These pickles are so astonishingly flavorful that it is hard to believe they are so easy to make.[read more]

     

     

     

    Lemon Pickles – South Indian Style

    lemon2When life offers me lemons I make pickles of them. I’d suggest the same to anybody who even remotely likes the citrus family. Because making lemonade out of them, to me is like saving the wrapper and throwing away the candy. The peels with all their essential oils,[read more]

     

     

     

    Bittermelon-Carrot-Mango Pickle/Pavakka Carrot Manga Achar (Ready To Eat)– Kerala Style

    IMG_3237

    This is my Mom’s all famous  mixed pickle recipe. It comes together fairly quickly and is one of my favorites. Like all mothers do, my Mom too eyeballs all her ingredients while cooking. So the proportions ..[read more]

     

    Lemon Pickle – South Indian Style


    2010
    01.12

    IMG_4037When life offers me lemons I make pickles of them. I’d suggest the same to anybody who even remotely likes the citrus family. Because making lemonade out of them, to me is like saving the wrapper and throwing away the candy. The peels with all their essential oils, vitamins, etc ., have so much good in them that it is wasteful to throw them away. This doesn’t in anyway imply that I don’t drink lemonade. I’m guilty of that pleasure very often. But, I do try to micro-plane their zest into anything I’m cooking that day. Another way I manage to use up the lemon as a whole is to preserve them in salt, let them pickle for weeks and then when they are done I slice up the rinds and add them to any recipe void desserts that calls for lemon juice, zest or rinds and a nice tangy bite pops up here and there in the food.

    So last November, when my friends-in-law the Rs, who have these two big lemon trees in their backyard that produce tons of voluptuous sweet lemons every winter, gave me these two big bags of citrus fruit, my innate citrus love decided it was pickle time again.

    lemon2

    I mostly pickle lemons the South Indian way for no good reason but habit. The main difference between the pickles from the South to that of the North is the oil in the vinaigrette. The South uses sesame oil and in the North it is mustard. Both give very distinct unique flavors and for me it is hard to say which I like better.

    Lemon pickles take a while to get done. roughly around 1.5 to 2 months. There is an unconventional method however (not acceptable to  the gurus of pickling), that speeds up the process of pickling for you. – Gently cooking your lemons to a boil. Though this speeds up the softening process and your pickles are ready for consumption in a week, it does reduce the shelf life of the pickle. So I’d advice you to do it only if you don’t have the patience to wait for a couple of months and you plan to refrigerate your pickles.

    Ingredients:
    6 –7 lemons, cut up into triangular bite size pieces, base the number of lemons on size, it  should fill up about 3 cups
    2 tbsp ginger grated 
    1/2 cup chili powder
    1/4 cup chopped green chilies
    2 tbsp black mustard seeds
    1/2 tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
    1/4 tsp asafoetida
    1 tsp turmeric
    3- 4 tbsp sesame oil (the golden, cold-pressed kind not the dark brown from toasted seeds found in the chinese market)
    1/3 -1/2 cup salt ( base it on taste, they should taste saltier than normal when just made.)

    Method:

  • Add chili, salt and turmeric to the lemon pieces and mix well. Make sure every piece of lemon is coated well.
  • Heat oil, add asafoetida, mustard and fenugreek powder and saute till the mustard pops.
  • Add ginger and green chilies and saute for 2-3 mins.
  • Cool it down to room temperature.
  • Add to the lemon pieces and mix well.
  • Bottle it in airtight jars and store in the coolest part of your pantry. Every couple of weeks give the jar a nice shake.

    It takes about 45 – 60 days for the pickles to be ready for consumption. When the pieces are soft you know your pickle is done

    .

  • Lemon Pickle – South Indian Style


    2010
    01.12

    IMG_4037When life offers me lemons I make pickles of them. I’d suggest the same to anybody who even remotely likes the citrus family. Because making lemonade out of them, to me is like saving the wrapper and throwing away the candy. The peels with all their essential oils, vitamins, etc ., have so much good in them that it is wasteful to throw them away. This doesn’t in anyway imply that I don’t drink lemonade. I’m guilty of that pleasure very often. But, I do try to micro-plane their zest into anything I’m cooking that day. Another way I manage to use up the lemon as a whole is to preserve them in salt, let them pickle for weeks and then when they are done I slice up the rinds and add them to any recipe void desserts that calls for lemon juice, zest or rinds and a nice tangy bite pops up here and there in the food.

    So last November, when my friends-in-law the Rs, who have these two big lemon trees in their backyard that produce tons of voluptuous sweet lemons every winter, gave me these two big bags of citrus fruit, my innate citrus love decided it was pickle time again.

    lemon2

    I mostly pickle lemons the South Indian way for no good reason but habit. The main difference between the pickles from the South to that of the North is the oil in the vinaigrette. The South uses sesame oil and in the North it is mustard. Both give very distinct unique flavors and for me it is hard to say which I like better.

    Lemon pickles take a while to get done. roughly around 1.5 to 2 months. There is an unconventional method however (not acceptable to  the gurus of pickling), that speeds up the process of pickling for you. – Gently cooking your lemons to a boil. Though this speeds up the softening process and your pickles are ready for consumption in a week, it does reduce the shelf life of the pickle. So I’d advice you to do it only if you don’t have the patience to wait for a couple of months and you plan to refrigerate your pickles.

    Ingredients:
    6 –7 lemons, cut up into triangular bite size pieces, base the number of lemons on size, it  should fill up about 3 cups
    2 tbsp ginger grated 
    1/2 cup chili powder
    1/4 cup chopped green chilies
    2 tbsp black mustard seeds
    1/2 tsp roasted fenugreek powder (dry roast fenugreek seeds and powder them)
    1/4 tsp asafoetida
    1 tsp turmeric
    3- 4 tbsp sesame oil (the golden, cold-pressed kind not the dark brown from toasted seeds found in the chinese market)
    1/3 -1/2 cup salt ( base it on taste, they should taste saltier than normal when just made.)

    Method:

  • Add chili, salt and turmeric to the lemon pieces and mix well. Make sure every piece of lemon is coated well.
  • Heat oil, add asafoetida, mustard and fenugreek powder and saute till the mustard pops.
  • Add ginger and green chilies and saute for 2-3 mins.
  • Cool it down to room temperature.
  • Add to the lemon pieces and mix well.
  • Bottle it in airtight jars and store in the coolest part of your pantry. Every couple of weeks give the jar a nice shake.

    It takes about 45 – 60 days for the pickles to be ready for consumption. When the pieces are soft you know your pickle is done

    .

  • Pickled Shrimp- Kerala Style


    2010
    01.12

    Among many other things, Kerala cuisine is popular for its lip-smacking zesty meat and seafood pickles. These pickles are so astonishingly flavorful that it is hard to believe they are so easy to make. Owe it to my Godmother, Auntie M’s influence, I always carry a jar or two of these in my fridge. I usually make them on cold weary days when I have nothing much else to do and seek refuge in my warm kitchen. They always come in handy at times when I’m too lazy to move a finger let alone cook (which happens more often than not) or when I hear my husband yawn while setting the dinner table.

    shrimp2

    Though the following recipe talks about shrimp, you could use any boneless fleshy fish diced into bite size chunks. Traditionally, these pickles are made by deep frying the shrimp or fish which really toughens it up. But, I think it is unnecessary to deprive the meat of all its moisture when you are anyway storing it in the fridge. So here’s the deal. Unless you want to keep your pickles forever say like a year or two and don’t have a refrigerator, then deep fry them. But, if you think you have enough space in your fridge for a jar or two of these and you have a family of gluttons (like I do), who will wipe them clean before you know it, shallow fry them until they are just cooked. It makes a world of difference in taste and texture. This stays perfectly fine for months and the older they get the tastier they become.

    Ingredients:
    1lb medium sized, deveined and shelled shrimp
    1 tbsp red chili powder
    1/4 cup finely sliced ginger
    1/4 cup finely sliced garlic
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    1 tsp mustard seeds
    1/2 tsp fenugreek seeds powder
    2 – 3 pinches of asafoetida powder
    3 green chilies finely chopped
    1/2 tsp whole black pepper corns
    1 – 2 sprigs of curry leaves
    1/4 cup vinegar
    oil as required (I use sesame oil – the golden, cold-pressed kind not the dark brown from toasted seeds found in the chinese market. It gives a very distinct flavor to the pickle. You can use any refined oil if you aren’t too fond of sesame)
    salt to taste.

    Directions:

  • Marinate the shrimp with 1/2 of the chili powder, turmeric powder, 1/2 of the vinegar and salt for 30 minutes.
  • Shallow fry the marinated shrimp until just cooked and keep it aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan, add asafoetida, fry mustard, fenugreek, black pepper and curry leaves.
  • Add the sliced ginger and garlic, green chili, and remaining chili powder and sauté until golden brown.
  • Add the fried shrimp, remaining vinegar and salt (it should taste slightly saltier than normal) and mix thoroughly. Add more heated oil, just sufficient to make sure all pieces of shrimp are covered with the vinaigrette. Put off the flame.
  • Mix everything thoroughly.
  • Bottle it in clean jars and keep it air tight.