Archive for the ‘Poultry’ Category

Muslim Biryani


2010
08.02

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Sing ye all good folks- Joy to my world!! I finally got my hands on the most divine recipes of all!!! The recipe that eluded me all these years, taunted my taste buds in ever so many occasions, teased my nostrils with its titillating whiff, ignored my yearning lustful eyes and and mockingly snuck away from my greedy grasps. YES!! I have it with me today. And who do I have to thank? My darling little niece, Sneha, who meticulously jotted down the recipe from her Muslim friend at school. My sweetheart cousin Jasmine, who trusted her daughter and her friend and followed the recipe to the T-recreating it, so the doubting Thomas in me  would believe. And my dear BIL EJ, who in seconds notice had the recipe scanned and printed for me to treasure – FOREVER!!! Now ain’t mine a dandy sweet family??! It sure is.

IMG_7843All those who have known me for even just about a week, let alone years,  would have had an earful about my long, unfailing loveand fidelity to what I think is the supreme food of all – The Muslim Biryani. For several years I tried making it deciphering it by taste. Experimenting with different combinations of spices and ingredients, I failed miserably though. I realize now, I was over thinking it the whole time. And since the proof is ALWAYS in the pudding, there is no doubt the arrogant me would have taken one look at Sneha’s notes and dismissed it as too simple to be true if Jasmine hadn’t made it that day so I could see, taste and believe.

My 4 attempts at trying this recipe were all successful barring one. The exception happened when I tried it at my sister Sophie’s where she stood beside me second guessing all the measurements and where after the first whistle of the pressure cooker, the kitchen was consumed by the powerful aroma of the Muslim Biryani , she proudly declared – yes we have done it. With just this premature avowal all hell broke loose. If she had ever cared to listen to my books of providence she would have known that you NEVER EVER go proud on your dish until you’ve tasted the first spoon, and if you are stupid enough to do that, you are screwed!!  Of course only because of that, the pressure cooker malfunctioned and we had to schlep burnt Biryani to the garbage bin. But, there is one thing worth mentioning though, the burnt carcass still smelt divine!!! So, if I were you, while following this recipe, I would not go second guessing it nor would I make any presumed declarations!

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All these years I always thought that the orange-ish red  color of the Muslim Biryani came from the tomatoes and the saffron. I couldn’t be more wrong. Apparently it is from the red chili powder. Something that I never  use in any of my Biryanis. And for the color, I added a lot of tomatoes -Mistake number 1. In spite of what my sister Sony thinks, I’m always tight fisted when it comes to using oil and ghee in my cooking. I maintain that while making Biryanis as well – Mistake number 2. There is no way that you can cringe on oil and ghee while making the Muslim Biryani. The onions and lots of ginger garlic, deep fried in ghee and oil is what gives this Biryani a totally new dimension.

Ingredients
1 lb skinless chicken cut into medium sized pieces
1 large  or 2 medium or 3 small onions finely sliced
1large tomato, diced in chunks
1/2 tsp turmeric powder
2 tbsp ginger–garlic paste 
8 cloves
5, 1/4 inch pieces of cinnamon 
2 crushed cardamom
3 cups jeera samba/basmati rice
1/2 cup curd
pinch of saffron
1/2 cup refined vegetable oil
1 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
2 tbsp chopped cilantro/coriander leaves
1 tbsp chopped mint
1 tsp red chili powder, alter this based on tolerable spice level
1tsp paprika/ kashmiri mirch
2 tbsp lemon juice
salt to taste

Directions

  • Marinate the chicken in lemon juice, 1/2 tbsp of ginger-garlic paste, curd, turmeric, mint, cilantro  and salt over night in the fridge.
  • Soak washed rice with 5 cups of water and set aside for an hour.
  • Heat refined oil and ghee  in a wide bottomed  hollow pan, make sure the pan can be fitted with a tight lid that doesn’t let steam escape.
  • Add cloves, cinnamon and cardamom and let them puff up.
  • Add the chopped onions and sauté until deep brown (the onions should look fried).
  • Add remaining ginger-garlic and sauté for a minute.
  • Add in the diced tomatoes, chili powders and sauté until oil separates.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Add in the chicken along with the marinade and sauté for 5 -10 minutes and then reduce the flame to low let it cook until chicken is done.
  • Add 1 tbsp of ghee, salt and cook the rice until the water boils and the rice is only  3/4 done.
  • Gather all the chicken and the masala mixture together and flatten it at he bottom of the pan
  • Dissolve a pinch of saffron in 2 tbsp of milk and add to the boiling rice and mix it.
  • Pour in the boiling rice into the pan making the rice form a layer on top of the masala and has no direct contact to the bottom of the pan.
  • Close the pan tight shut and let it sit on the very low flame for 15 – 20 min or until the rice at the top is done.
  • Removefrom the stove and mix in the rice and masala
  • Serve with raitha or baingan masaledar.
  • Simple Biryani with Whole Spices


    2010
    05.18

    The kitchen at my sister Sophie’s, is always open round the clock!. Ok, I take it back. There might be a quiet time between, say around 12 midnight to daybreak 5. But the rest of the time, a stove is always lit. It might not come as a surprise to you, knowing how greedy I am about food, that this is one among the many things I look forward to when I visit India. And like I have mentioned before, Sophie is a fine cook and I’m one of her biggest fans. This simple Biryani recipe that she often makes, uses whole spices and it is amazing how different, spices taste when ground, and when used as a whole.

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    Ingredients
    1 lb skinless and boned chicken cut into medium sized pieces
    1 large  or 2 medium sized onions finely sliced
    4 large tomatoes, diced in chunks
    5- 6 green chilies, slit length wise
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 tbsp grated ginger
    2 tbsp diced garlic
    1/2 tsp black pepper corns
    8 cloves
    6, 1/4 inch pieces of cinnamon
    1/2 tsp whole fennel seeds/saunf
    3 cups jeera samba rice
    1/4 cup curd
    pinch of saffron
    refined vegetable oil
    2 tsp sesame oil or ghee (clarified butter)
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro/coriander leaves
    1 tbsp chopped mint
    1/2 tsp red chili powder, alter this based on tolerable spice level
    2 tbsp lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    Directions

  • Marinate the chicken in lemon juice, curd, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, pepper corns, green chilies, chili powder, mint, cilantro  and salt over night in the fridge.
  • Soak washed rice with 5 cups of water and set aside for an hour.
  • Heat 2 – 3 tbsp of oil  in a wide bottomed  hollow pan, make sure the pan can be fitted with a tight lid that doesn’t let steam escape.
  • Add fennel, and let it splutter.
  • Add 3/4th of the chopped onions and sauté until golden brown.
  • Crush the grated ginger and garlic and add them to the pan along with the green chilies and continue to sauté for 5 minutes.
  • Add in the diced tomatoes and sauté until oil separates.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Add in the chicken along with the marinade and sauté for 5 -10 minutes and then reduce the flame to low let it cook until chicken is done.
  • Add 2 tbsp of sesame oil or ghee, salt and cook the rice until the water boils and the rice is only  3/4 done.
  • Gather all the chicken and the masala mixture together and flatten it at he bottom of the pan
  • Dissolve a pinch of saffron in 2 tbsp of milk and add to the boiling rice and mix it.
  • Pour in the boiling rice into the pan making the rice form a layer on top of the masala and has no direct contact to the bottom of the pan.
  • Close the pan tight shut and let it sit on the very low flame for 15 – 20 min or until the rice at the top is done.
  • Remove from the stove and mix in the rice and masala
  • Deep fry the remaining sliced onion and sprinkle on the rice as garnish.
  • Serve with raitha or baingan masaledar.
  • A Birdie’s Nest


    2010
    04.26

    Idiyappams or little pockets of steamed rice noodles that Nish often refers to as birdie’s nest, is one of Roy’s favorites :D. Yes, I can’t suppress a grin (smirk?) when I refer to the favorites of a person, who eats almost everything and anything with the same gusto like he were eating the best meal of his life! Here’s what I mean- Idlis and Dosas he hates. But, can/will eat about 8-10 of them. Idiyappams and Paalappams he loves and can/will eat about 10 – 12 of them. So, would you call me a nag if I said to him, Kanna do you really think you need to go for that 12th appam?  My sister Sonia, thinks so. According to her, even though there is the term of endearment ‘Kanna‘ in the sentence, my voice modulation and pitch decibel makes it sound more like – you jerk, you really think you can afford another of those onto to your ever growing waistline?

    IMG_7061

    OMG you are going to drive him crazy just like Mummy did Papa., OMG leave the poor guy alone., OMG I wonder how he still continues to live with you., OMG you’ve really lost it., ….*eyes rolling*, is all  I’ve heard, ever since I unloaded my bags in Bangalore, 3 weeks back having just arrived from SFO. Any accusations I can bear. But telling a girl that she is turning into her mother is gut wrenching and the worst kind of name-calling in my opinion. I know my sister means well and however convoluted and twisted like Idiyappams, her logic might sound, I’ve decided to try and not become my mother.

    So, as I served Roy, this morning, his nth idiyappam that Mini chechi, my sister-in-law, made for breakfast, and as usual,  when Roy pretended to refuse, in the typical Indian style with his hand on his tummy indicating he was full, but his plate evidently thrust forward to be served more, I sweetly chimed, Go ahead Kanna it is not everyday that you get to eat Mini chehi’s Idiyappams, I’m sure you could find a tinsy bit more space for just another one. Now, how is that for NICE, Sony???

    Idiyappam/Steamed Rice Noodles

    IMG_7056I like these best when served with lamb/chicken stew or boiled eggs in coconut gravy. But if you are a thorough vegetarian and don’t do even eggs, then, the best alternative would be to eat these with some Kerala style Kadala Curry… [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     Motta Curry / Eggs in Coconut Gravy

    IMG_7061

    This easy to make dish is a variation of my kerala chicken curry. I’ve simply replaced chicken with eggs here… [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    A Birdie’s Nest


    2010
    04.26

    Idiyappams or little pockets of steamed rice noodles that Nish often refers to as birdie’s nest, is one of Roy’s favorites :D. Yes, I can’t suppress a grin (smirk?) when I refer to the favorites of a person, who eats almost everything and anything with the same gusto like he were eating the best meal of his life! Here’s what I mean- Idlis and Dosas he hates. But, can/will eat about 8-10 of them. Idiyappams and Paalappams he loves and can/will eat about 10 – 12 of them. So, would you call me a nag if I said to him, Kanna do you really think you need to go for that 12th appam?  My sister Sonia, thinks so. According to her, even though there is the term of endearment ‘Kanna‘ in the sentence, my voice modulation and pitch decibel makes it sound more like – you jerk, you really think you can afford another of those onto to your ever growing waistline?

    IMG_7061

    OMG you are going to drive him crazy just like Mummy did Papa., OMG leave the poor guy alone., OMG I wonder how he still continues to live with you., OMG you’ve really lost it., ….*eyes rolling*, is all  I’ve heard, ever since I unloaded my bags in Bangalore, 3 weeks back having just arrived from SFO. Any accusations I can bear. But telling a girl that she is turning into her mother is gut wrenching and the worst kind of name-calling in my opinion. I know my sister means well and however convoluted and twisted like Idiyappams, her logic might sound, I’ve decided to try and not become my mother.

    So, as I served Roy, this morning, his nth idiyappam that Mini chechi, my sister-in-law, made for breakfast, and as usual,  when Roy pretended to refuse, in the typical Indian style with his hand on his tummy indicating he was full, but his plate evidently thrust forward to be served more, I sweetly chimed, Go ahead Kanna it is not everyday that you get to eat Mini chehi’s Idiyappams, I’m sure you could find a tinsy bit more space for just another one. Now, how is that for NICE, Sony???

    Idiyappam/Steamed Rice Noodles

    IMG_7056I like these best when served with lamb/chicken stew or boiled eggs in coconut gravy. But if you are a thorough vegetarian and don’t do even eggs, then, the best alternative would be to eat these with some Kerala style Kadala Curry… [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     Motta Curry / Eggs in Coconut Gravy

    IMG_7061

    This easy to make dish is a variation of my kerala chicken curry. I’ve simply replaced chicken with eggs here… [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Motta Curry / Eggs in Coconut Gravy


    2010
    04.24

    IMG_7061

    This easy to make dish is a variation of my kerala chicken curry. I’ve simply replaced chicken with eggs here. This makes a great accompaniment for rotis or appams.

    Ingredients

    6 boiled eggs each cut into half
    1 medium sized onion, finely sliced
    2 -3 shallots finely sliced
    1/4 tsp kerala garam masala
    1/2 tsp coriander powder
    1 tsp chili powder (base it on tolerable spice level)
    2 tbsp coconut Oil
    1/2 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    1/4 tsp roasted cumin powder
    1/4 cup canned coconut milk ( use 1 cup thick coconut milk if you are making fresh from scratch)
    salt to taste
    one sprig Curry Leaves
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1/4 tsp whole black pepper corns

    Directions

  • Heat 1 tbsp of coconut oil in cooking pan, splutter 1/4 tsp mustard seeds, add cumin, pepper corns and onions and sauté till the onions are nicely caramelized. The onions have to attain a deep brown color.
  • Add ginger-garlic to the pan and continue sautéing until the oil separates.
  • Add turmeric, chili, coriander, garam masala powders and salt and mix well for 4 – 5 minutes.
  • Add 1/2 cup of water reduce heat and let it simmer covered for 10 – 15 mins,  stirring occasionally.
  • Add coconut milk, mix it thoroughly and let it remain on very low flame for a couple of minutes.
  • Finally, shallow fry shallots with 1 tbsp of coconut oil remaining mustard seeds and curry leaves and season the curry.
  • Serve with Appams or Indian breads.
  • Mexican Anybody?


    2010
    03.29

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    Whenever I make my occasional visits to the office, my Boss always treats me with a good lunch. It is his way of appreciating the 60 mile commute I make to reach there. He’s either  plain nice or he’s too busy to realize that he signs my pay checks and that these gestures of politeness are totally unnecessary, and whether I like it or not, I  darn well need to get my fat behind there when he requires me to.  I hope though, it is the former. Because I’d hate the day when he’d recover from his amnesia and I’d be left to eat those cold sandwiches from the next door deli. What can I say? My belly has been spoilt rotten with these elegant treats!

    At first, when he suggested a nice Indian place, I gladly agreed. Assuming it was the popular preference among my All-American colleagues, I gave no second thought to it. But, during the second and subsequent 3rd and 4th visit when we had exhausted all the fine Indian restaurants of the Marin county, and were redoing the circle, it slowly dawned on me that they were doing it all for me. Me? ME? A thorough bred Indian, who cooked and ate three, sometimes four (I can’t help it, I get hungry) Indian meals a day? No offence implied, but, would you offer a fish cold water? Look, look there’s ice in it. Get excited!!!

    Well, I had to get out of it. I couldn’t deprive my greed of those fabulous restaurants and cuisines in the North bay, so waiting for me to explore. I hatched up a plan. I decided to  play the pregnant woman & nausea card. It came easy for me. Sincerity has never been one of my finer virtues and I always try to make the best use of the card I’m dealt. So, the next time at work when a colleague, for politeness sake, asked me how I was doing, apart from my usual rants about the discomforts of carrying a 6 lb something being inside me, I threw in how horribly nauseous I was and how Indian food made it worse. I caused sufficient distress in my desperate efforts, volunteering unsanitized and unsolicited information that I literally turned faces green!!! Eventually the whole office had an ear about my beef with Indian food, and come lunch time, the Boss had a miraculous change of plans. That afternoon we all sat at the fine Las Camellias, where we were treated with one of the finest Mexican food that I’ve ever eaten. I was so happy to get out of the previous set up that I couldn’t help but exaggerate how impressed I was. And what do you know? The next time I was making one my sporadic visits, guess where we went for lunch? Las Camellias again!!! I wasn’t joking when I said I went overboard with the praises. My Boss, the nice man that he is, didn’t think twice about taking me anywhere else. All because I’d declared – oooh the food is so divine, I could die here.

    So, its been Las Camellias ever since. But, I’m not complaining. The food is indeed divine there. The dying part, I’m not sure though. But, I love it so much, that all the Mexican food I attempt to make, I try to recreate with my memory from there. And the fact that I’ve eaten there quite a number of times now ;), the spices are well registered in my buds that I’ve almost succeeded in making it exactly like they do. Though I hope the chef there never ever ever gets to read this ;)!!!!

    Mexican Rice with Bell Peppers

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    This rice was my saving grace when I was pregnant with Nish. Though horribly nauseous all the time, I still craved for rice. Now, don”t ask me how that works ..[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Shrimp And Red Pepper Quesadillas

    IMG_5948Quesadillas are like burgers you can make them any which way you want as long you have tortillas and cheese with you. Everything else that goes inside depends on what you are looking ..[read more]

     

     

     

     

    Refried Black Beans

    IMG_5946 While making refried beans, though pinto is more popular, I usually use Black beans. Some one once told me they were healthier.,,[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Chicken Mole Poblano 

    IMG_5951

    This is one dish, when I make I can be assured, doing the dishes will be easy. Roy, literally wipes (licks?) clean all the pots, pans, bowls, plates, spoons, everything that has had even a remote acquaintance ..[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

    Chicken Mole Poblano


    2010
    03.29

    IMG_5951

    This is one dish, when I make I can be assured, doing the dishes will be easy. Roy, literally wipes (licks?) clean all the pots, pans, bowls, plates, spoons, everything that has had even a remote acquaintance with the dish. It is not a pleasant sight. But I think for a guy, who sacrifices so much, including his mind, to keep me happy, the least I can do is suppress my disgust and smile as he slurps through the entire dish in a matter of minutes.

    I use  skinless chicken breasts and simmer them for a long time in mole, made with a combination of dried chili peppers (chipotle and ancho), chocolate, cinnamon, cloves, nuts, tomatoes, onions and garlic. You can vary the combination of peppers and the quantity, to your taste. We are a family that likes food really spicy. So, I don’t deseed any of my peppers. But, I wouldn’t recommend that you do the same unless you have paralyzed taste buds like ours.

    Ingredients
    2 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    1small onion, chopped fine
    1 tomato, chopped
    2 cloves garlic, chopped
    1/4 tsp ground cumin 
    1/4 tsp cinnamon clove spice mix
    2 chipotle peppers
    2 ancho peppers
    1 cup chicken broth
    1 tbsp peanut butter
    1 tbsp shavings of bittersweet chocolate preferably Mexican)
    1 lb chicken breasts
    1 tbsp lemon juice
    1/2 tsp oregano (preferably Mexican)
    1 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro
    salt and black pepper to taste

    Directions

  • Marinate chicken seasoned with salt and pepper with lemon juice for about 30 minutes.
  • Tear the ancho and chipotle peppers and soak them in warm water for about 30 minutes till they are soft
  • Heat 1 tbsp oil in a heavy bottomed skillet.
  • Add onions, garlic and sauté until the onions turn translucent.
  • Add tomatoes and sauté until they form a mush.
  • Transfer to a blender, add the soaked peppers, cumin, peanut butter, spice mix, oregano and chocolate and blend to a smooth paste.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of oil in the same skillet and brown the chicken on all sides.
  • Pour in the mole sauce and chicken broth and let it simmer for 45- 50 minutes until the chicken is cooked tender and the sauce is thickened.
  • Garnish with fresh cilantro and serve hot.
  • Chinese – An order of 2- Entrée Plate Coming Right up


    2010
    03.14

    IMG_5529

    Ok, I’m being upfront in saying this -These are not Indo Chinese recipes (if that was what you were hoping for). Is it authentic Chinese? I’m afraid, not. The recipes are as Chinese as you think ‘Panda Express’ is ;).

    While dining out, for my family, the husband, the son and myself  included, good taste and some amount of hygiene is all that it takes, to float our boat.  We don’t care much for authenticity, snooty ambiances or high profile chefs. On the other hand, throw in some confusion, a harried waiter messing up with orders, a whining child there, a falling cutlery here,  and we’ll blend right in. Owe it to my thrifty Mallu blood, I hate to see good money go down the drain, and that, is exactly what I think happens at most of these supercilious restaurants. Their bite size portions, invariably leaves me eating a follow up dinner at home or, when fate is out bent on grudging me, I wind up to-going the insipid spread, and after having paid a couple of hundred dollar for a an ounce of salmon or crab, I’m back to square one, behind the apron, altering the packed meals to fit our tastes.
    In comparison, this bourgeois American-Chinese chain, though might not have lofty sounding names on their menu, has always managed to provide hearty satisfying meals for my family, every time we’ve eaten at the food court, while shopping at the local mall. I accept, the food is slightly on the greasier side than I would like (the only reason, I try making them myself). But, I find the taste awesome. So, whenever I have lots of veggies in the fridge and when there is very little time to cook, I invariably try to imitate Panda express at home.

    Stir-Fried Mushrooms and Asparagus in Chili Garlic Sauce

    IMG_5422

     The best way to use up left over vegetables that don’t need much cooking time, is to make a stir-fry out of them. You can use any combination of vegetables you like. .[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

    Ginger Sesame Shrimp with Snow Peas

    IMG_5472

    The vibrant colors of fresh vegetables never fail to excite me.  I always try to pick a couple of  bright colored vegetables while I grocery shop..[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Chinese Egg Fried Rice

    IMG_5516The trick to getting fried rice to smell and taste like the ‘Chinese’ kind, is to add the rice when the eggs are 1/2 done..[read more]

    Chinese – An order of 2- Entrée Plate Coming Right up


    2010
    03.14

    IMG_5529

    Ok, I’m being upfront in saying this -These are not Indo Chinese recipes (if that was what you were hoping for). Is it authentic Chinese? I’m afraid, not. The recipes are as Chinese as you think ‘Panda Express’ is ;).

    While dining out, for my family, the husband, the son and myself  included, good taste and some amount of hygiene is all that it takes, to float our boat.  We don’t care much for authenticity, snooty ambiances or high profile chefs. On the other hand, throw in some confusion, a harried waiter messing up with orders, a whining child there, a falling cutlery here,  and we’ll blend right in. Owe it to my thrifty Mallu blood, I hate to see good money go down the drain, and that, is exactly what I think happens at most of these supercilious restaurants. Their bite size portions, invariably leaves me eating a follow up dinner at home or, when fate is out bent on grudging me, I wind up to-going the insipid spread, and after having paid a couple of hundred dollar for a an ounce of salmon or crab, I’m back to square one, behind the apron, altering the packed meals to fit our tastes.
    In comparison, this bourgeois American-Chinese chain, though might not have lofty sounding names on their menu, has always managed to provide hearty satisfying meals for my family, every time we’ve eaten at the food court, while shopping at the local mall. I accept, the food is slightly on the greasier side than I would like (the only reason, I try making them myself). But, I find the taste awesome. So, whenever I have lots of veggies in the fridge and when there is very little time to cook, I invariably try to imitate Panda express at home.

    Stir-Fried Mushrooms and Asparagus in Chili Garlic Sauce

    IMG_5422

     The best way to use up left over vegetables that don’t need much cooking time, is to make a stir-fry out of them. You can use any combination of vegetables you like. .[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

    Ginger Sesame Shrimp with Snow Peas

    IMG_5472

    The vibrant colors of fresh vegetables never fail to excite me.  I always try to pick a couple of  bright colored vegetables while I grocery shop..[read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     

     Chinese Egg Fried Rice

    IMG_5516The trick to getting fried rice to smell and taste like the ‘Chinese’ kind, is to add the rice when the eggs are 1/2 done..[read more]

    Chinese Egg Fried Rice


    2010
    03.13

    IMG_5516

    The trick to getting fried rice, to smell and taste like the ‘Chinese’ kind, is to add the rice when the eggs are 1/2 done. This allows the eggs to stick to the rice grains, forming an unusual aroma and taste, very typical of Chinese fried rice. For me, while making fried rice, eggs, spring onions, peas, carrots and celery are a must have. Everything else you can do with or without. I also refrigerate the cooked rice for a couple of hours before the actual preparation, because I never seem to have left over rice, like the popular advice declares.

    Ingredients.

    2 cups jasmine rice or any other long grain rice
    4 cups of chicken stock or vegetable stock
    4 tbsp oyster sauce
    4 tbsp soy sauce
    2 eggs, beaten
    2 tbsp peanut oil
    2 tbsp toasted sesame oil
    11/2 cups of mixed vegetables (peas, carrots, celery etc)
    4 tbsp spring onion
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    salt and  white pepper to taste

    Directions

  • Cook the rice with 4 cups of chicken stock, 2 tbsp of soy sauce and 2 tbsp of sesame oil and salt to taste. Refrigerate for 2  – 3 hours.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of peanut oil in a wok.
  • Add garlic and sauté for about  15 –20 seconds, just about till the garlic begins to cook.
  • Add the mixed vegetables and  stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Remove the vegetables and set aside.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of peanut oil in the same wok.
  • Add the eggs and stir constantly. When the eggs are about half done, add in the rice. Make sure you fluff up the rice using your fingers before you add it into the wok. Stir well until the egg is cooked.
  • Add in the remaining sauces, stir-fried vegetables and spring onions. Mix well. Add pepper and adjust salt to taste. Turn off the flame.
  • Serve with any meat or vegetable side.