Posts Tagged ‘Curd’

Bagalabhath – Seasoned Curd Rice


2010
07.15

IMG_7564

My mother insists that every grand child of hers eat a small bowl of curd rice during at least one of the meals in a day. Apparently she’s heard it through the grapevine that it is the quintessential food for developing young brains. And the best part, listen to this – you can’t have the rice and the yogurt on their own. For it to work right, it has to be a combination of the two *eyes rolling*. Anyway I simply abide because, like I’ve said before, I don’t have any moral fiber left in me to face her wrath and scorn if I question her. Also, I’ve come to love this dish because, trust me, I was made to eat quite a number of these bowls through out my life time – by you know whom!! Look how bright and intelligent those bowls have made me ;)!

Jokes apart, this is actually quite a refreshing treat on a hot summers day! With a little bit of grated carrots and ginger to bite into, some crushed nuts for the crunch and some fresh cilantro to add color this truly is a delicate eye and a palette pleaser. 

Ingredients:

1/2 cup well /over cooked slightly warm white rice
1 cup thick curd
1 tsp fresh seedless arils of pomegranate
1 tbsp grated carrot
1/4 tsp grated ginger
1 tbsp grated cucumber
1/4 tsp finely chopped green chilies
1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
1 tsp cold pressed sesame oil
1 tsp chopped cashew nuts
1 tsp chopped cilantro
4-5 curry leaves
salt to taste
2 dried whole red chilies

Directions

  • Fluff the rice with a fork and whip the curd separately.
  • Mix well the rice, curd and ginger and add salt to taste.
  • Now mix the curd and ginger with this paste.
  • Heat the sesame oil, once the oil is hot add mustard seeds,when it pops add the red chilies, green chilies, cashew nuts and curry leaves and sauté for a minute.
  • Turn off the flame and pour the seasoning over the curd and rice mixture.
  • Garnish with cilantro, carrots, cucumber and pomegranate.
  • Serve with spicy Indian pickles or wafers
  • Bagalabhath – Seasoned Curd Rice


    2010
    07.15

    IMG_7564

    My mother insists that every grand child of hers eat a small bowl of curd rice during at least one of the meals in a day. Apparently she’s heard it through the grapevine that it is the quintessential food for developing young brains. And the best part, listen to this – you can’t have the rice and the yogurt on their own. For it to work right, it has to be a combination of the two *eyes rolling*. Anyway I simply abide because, like I’ve said before, I don’t have any moral fiber left in me to face her wrath and scorn if I question her. Also, I’ve come to love this dish because, trust me, I was made to eat quite a number of these bowls through out my life time – by you know whom!! Look how bright and intelligent those bowls have made me ;)!

    Jokes apart, this is actually quite a refreshing treat on a hot summers day! With a little bit of grated carrots and ginger to bite into, some crushed nuts for the crunch and some fresh cilantro to add color this truly is a delicate eye and a palette pleaser. 

    Ingredients:

    1/2 cup well /over cooked slightly warm white rice
    1 cup thick curd
    1 tsp fresh seedless arils of pomegranate
    1 tbsp grated carrot
    1/4 tsp grated ginger
    1 tbsp grated cucumber
    1/4 tsp finely chopped green chilies
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    1 tsp cold pressed sesame oil
    1 tsp chopped cashew nuts
    1 tsp chopped cilantro
    4-5 curry leaves
    salt to taste
    2 dried whole red chilies

    Directions

  • Fluff the rice with a fork and whip the curd separately.
  • Mix well the rice, curd and ginger and add salt to taste.
  • Now mix the curd and ginger with this paste.
  • Heat the sesame oil, once the oil is hot add mustard seeds,when it pops add the red chilies, green chilies, cashew nuts and curry leaves and sauté for a minute.
  • Turn off the flame and pour the seasoning over the curd and rice mixture.
  • Garnish with cilantro, carrots, cucumber and pomegranate.
  • Serve with spicy Indian pickles or wafers
  • Shahi Lamb Kofta – Meatballs in Tomato Almond Crème Sauce


    2010
    02.01

    ShahiLambKofta

    Like most, if not all Indian mothers, I’m totally cuckoo when it comes to feeding my son. I’m constantly gnawed with worry that my son might be starving himself to death. That, deficient of nutrition, his brains might not meet the Ivy league standards causing his Godmother’s and Dad’s dreams for  his future, to plummet  with a thud. Now, into his third year, my insanity thankfully has considerably lessened.  I still need a lot of work though. But compared to where I was during his first year, when I’d managed to drive the poor baby to gag at the very sight of a boob, I’ve come a long way. Forgive me all you future girlfriends of N, don’t take it personally if he’s put off or shows no interest at your assets. It is not you. It is all the doing of his ignorant first time Mommy.

    Sadly, the initial years of torture at the hands of his mother also drove N to become the pickiest of eaters in the entire universe. It could be bad karma as well. I drove my mother crazy when it came to eating as a child. So, it was inevitable that fate would eventually gang up on me. Unbeknownst to fate however, was the viciously vengeful side of my ‘crazy’. For every food that N didn’t eat, I found another that he did, and soon disguised the former into the latter. Time was also in my favor, and I found it pretty easy to fool a toddler. I’ve gradually been reducing the disguise, and over a period of time this has helped him acquire taste for food he thought he didn’t like. Broken wheat instead of macaroni, veggie koftas instead of meat balls have slowly become some of his favorites 🙂

    The following recipe is for a traditional lamb kofta dish. But I can’t help myself from saying this – For mom’s with picky eaters to feed, koftas truly have a lot of room to hide in tons of good stuff. Veggies, eggs, broken wheat, nuts to name a few. Phew! There I said it! These are just my suggestions. Please don’t be encouraged to become a loony like me ;).

    Variations: A healthier option would be to use chicken or turkey instead of lamb for the koftas. But if you like to indulge in food like me, beef or pork works great too.

    lamb kofta

    Ingredients (for the meatballs/kofta)
    1 lb ground lamb
    1 beaten egg
    1/2 cup finely chopped spring onions
    1 tbsp fresh ginger garlic paste
    2 tsp finely chopped cilantro
    1 tsp finely chopped mint 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
    1 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin powder”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp black pepper ground
    1/4 tsp salt
    1 tsp kashmiri garam masala
    Ingredients (for the gravy)
    One large or 2 med sized onions chopped to a mince.
    1 tbsp ginger garlic paste
    3-4 tomatoes pureed
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin powder”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product]
    4 tbsp almonds
    1 cup fresh yogurt
    1 tsp paprika (mainly for color)
    1 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cayanne pepper/red chili powder”]B0001UQVUM[/amazon-product]
    1/2 teaspoon whole black pepper
    1 tsp kashmiri garam masala
    2 [amazon-product type=”text” text=”bay leaves”]B00017P2H8[/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
    2 tsp chopped cilantro
    2 – 3 tbsp refined vegetable oil
    salt to taste

    I make a slight variation in the gravy for chicken or turkey koftas – I use 1/2 cup half & half  instead of yogurt and replace 2 tbsp of almonds with 2 tbsp of cashew nuts

    Directions

  • Mix all the ingredients for the kofta gently and make golf sized balls and set aside.
  • Soak the nuts in water and grind to a smooth paste.
  • Heat oil in a pan, stir in [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product], whole black pepper and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”bay leaves”]B00017P2H8[/amazon-product]
  • Add onions and sauté until golden brown.
  •  Add  ginger garlic paste and stir in until oil separates.
  • Add pureed tomatoes, [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product], [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cayanne pepper”]B0001UQVUM[/amazon-product], paprika, almond paste, and garam masala and sauté until oil separates.
  •  Add yogurt, salt and water to get desired consistency and bring to boil.
  • Reduce the heat to low and carefully place the meatballs in the skillet in a single layer. Cover and continue cooking for 10 – 15 minutes on low heat.
  • Add more water if consistency is too thick and bring to boil before taking it off the flame, garnish with chopped cilantro.
  • Serve with rice or Indian breads. 
  • Shahi Lamb Kofta – Meatballs in Tomato Almond Crème Sauce


    2010
    02.01

    ShahiLambKofta

    Like most, if not all Indian mothers, I’m totally cuckoo when it comes to feeding my son. I’m constantly gnawed with worry that my son might be starving himself to death. That, deficient of nutrition, his brains might not meet the Ivy league standards causing his Godmother’s and Dad’s dreams for  his future, to plummet  with a thud. Now, into his third year, my insanity thankfully has considerably lessened.  I still need a lot of work though. But compared to where I was during his first year, when I’d managed to drive the poor baby to gag at the very sight of a boob, I’ve come a long way. Forgive me all you future girlfriends of N, don’t take it personally if he’s put off or shows no interest at your assets. It is not you. It is all the doing of his ignorant first time Mommy.

    Sadly, the initial years of torture at the hands of his mother also drove N to become the pickiest of eaters in the entire universe. It could be bad karma as well. I drove my mother crazy when it came to eating as a child. So, it was inevitable that fate would eventually gang up on me. Unbeknownst to fate however, was the viciously vengeful side of my ‘crazy’. For every food that N didn’t eat, I found another that he did, and soon disguised the former into the latter. Time was also in my favor, and I found it pretty easy to fool a toddler. I’ve gradually been reducing the disguise, and over a period of time this has helped him acquire taste for food he thought he didn’t like. Broken wheat instead of macaroni, veggie koftas instead of meat balls have slowly become some of his favorites 🙂

    The following recipe is for a traditional lamb kofta dish. But I can’t help myself from saying this – For mom’s with picky eaters to feed, koftas truly have a lot of room to hide in tons of good stuff. Veggies, eggs, broken wheat, nuts to name a few. Phew! There I said it! These are just my suggestions. Please don’t be encouraged to become a loony like me ;).

    Variations: A healthier option would be to use chicken or turkey instead of lamb for the koftas. But if you like to indulge in food like me, beef or pork works great too.

    lamb kofta

    Ingredients (for the meatballs/kofta)
    1 lb ground lamb
    1 beaten egg
    1/2 cup finely chopped spring onions
    1 tbsp fresh ginger garlic paste
    2 tsp finely chopped cilantro
    1 tsp finely chopped mint 1/2 cup breadcrumbs
    1 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin powder”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp black pepper ground
    1/4 tsp salt
    1 tsp kashmiri garam masala
    Ingredients (for the gravy)
    One large or 2 med sized onions chopped to a mince.
    1 tbsp ginger garlic paste
    3-4 tomatoes pureed
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin powder”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product]
    4 tbsp almonds
    1 cup fresh yogurt
    1 tsp paprika (mainly for color)
    1 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cayanne pepper/red chili powder”]B0001UQVUM[/amazon-product]
    1/2 teaspoon whole black pepper
    1 tsp kashmiri garam masala
    2 [amazon-product type=”text” text=”bay leaves”]B00017P2H8[/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
    2 tsp chopped cilantro
    2 – 3 tbsp refined vegetable oil
    salt to taste

    I make a slight variation in the gravy for chicken or turkey koftas – I use 1/2 cup half & half  instead of yogurt and replace 2 tbsp of almonds with 2 tbsp of cashew nuts

    Directions

  • Mix all the ingredients for the kofta gently and make golf sized balls and set aside.
  • Soak the nuts in water and grind to a smooth paste.
  • Heat oil in a pan, stir in [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin”]B000JMAVVC[/amazon-product], whole black pepper and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”bay leaves”]B00017P2H8[/amazon-product]
  • Add onions and sauté until golden brown.
  •  Add  ginger garlic paste and stir in until oil separates.
  • Add pureed tomatoes, [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product], [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cayanne pepper”]B0001UQVUM[/amazon-product], paprika, almond paste, and garam masala and sauté until oil separates.
  •  Add yogurt, salt and water to get desired consistency and bring to boil.
  • Reduce the heat to low and carefully place the meatballs in the skillet in a single layer. Cover and continue cooking for 10 – 15 minutes on low heat.
  • Add more water if consistency is too thick and bring to boil before taking it off the flame, garnish with chopped cilantro.
  • Serve with rice or Indian breads. 
  • Kerala Moru Curry / Curried Buttermilk


    2010
    01.26

    more2The Indian subcontinent has a gazillion different recipes that work with yogurt and buttermilk as the main ingredient. Some take forever to make. Some not so long and some come together in a matter of minutes. Moru curry is one such yogurt dish made traditionally in Kerala and has a thousand and one variations in preparation.

    This dish, along with some form of fish, was served invariably for every meal at the Ganapathiplackals (yes, that weird sounding thing is my maiden name). There were subtle deviations in the recipes every other day though. Sometimes they had vegetables in them, at times ground coconut, onions, ginger and garlic, sometimes   all of these and most times, plain by itself just seasoned with mustard, fenugreek, curry leaves and chilies. I got so used to eating this at most of our meals that till today if it is Kerala cuisine, and there is no ‘Moru Curry’ in it, I find it quite incomplete no matter how elaborate the spread might be.

    Ingredients

    2 cups yogurt
    3 tbsp Grated Coconut
    2 –3 shallots
    1 tsp finely chopped garlic
    1tsp finely grated ginger
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
    1/4 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”fenugreek seeds”]B000RHSW10[/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin seeds”]B000JMBECW [/amazon-product]
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”black mustard seeds”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product]
    4 dried red chilies
    1 –2 sprigs of curry leaves
    2 tbsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”coconut oil”]B002DGNP10[/amazon-product]/refined oil
    salt to taste

    moru

    Directions

  • Beat curd with equal quantity of water and set aside.
  • Grind coconut, [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product], 2 red chilies  and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin”]B000JMBECW [/amazon-product]
    with a little water to a  fine paste.
  • Add curd to the coconut mixture and blend.
  • Gently warm on low flame, stirring constantly.
  • Heat oil in a shallow pan, Add [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product], [amazon-product type=”text” text=”fenugreek seeds”]B000RHSW10[/amazon-product], remaining red chilies and curry leaves.
  • When the [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product] pops, add ginger, garlic and shallots and sauté till golden brown.
  • Let this cool for a bit and then pour on top of the curd mixture with constant stirring.
  • Put off the flame.
  • Serve with white rice.
  • Tomato Onion Raita


    2009
    12.30

    This amazingly simple salad is refreshingly soothing on a hot summer day. My husband in a big lover of yogurt and this salad is something that he would pour on top of anything and everything if he had a choice. Though I don’t recommend that :), I think it tastes splendid plain by itself and goes very well with  with any spicy dish, like Biryanis, Pulaos, Indian breads etc. When paired with any dish, the slightly sour yogurt with luscious tomatoes and crunchy sweet onion chunks, though subdues the over effects of the spices, surprisingly forms a new intense flavor in the process.

    Tomato Onion Raita

    Ingredients

    3 tomatoes, diced into small chunks
    1 red onion, finely diced
    1 green chilies, diced julienne style (optional)
    3 tbsp finely chopped cilantro
    2 cups yogurt
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Mix tomatoes, onions, cilantro, green chilies, yogurt together and add salt to taste. You have your raita in a jiffy.

    Now wasn’t that easy?!