Posts Tagged ‘Rice’

All About Dosas


2011
05.06

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Dosas are yummy crêpes made from fermented batter of rice and black gram. These can be made and eaten in a gazillion different forms. I plan on updating this post as and when I make the different kinds and combinations of them. That’s why the title “All About”. The basic batter for most of them can be made using the below proportions. It is eventually what else you add into this batter and how you make the crêpes that give the various forms and names to this wonderful delight.

Ghee Roast – This golden brown super thin crisp crêpe roasted to perfection in ghee and served right off the flame with mouth watering coconut chutneys is probably the most simple dosa of all and my favorite. So, obviously it goes first in my list of recipes

Ingredients

3 cups idli /parboiled rice (if you don’t have it go ahead and use raw rice)
1 cup urad dal(skinned black gram)
1 tsp fenugreek (methi) seeds
2 tbsp channa dal
1 tbsp mung dal
3 tbsp cooked rice(can be replaced with poha/beaten rice)
salt to taste
ghee for roasting the crepe

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Directions

  • Soak the rice, methi and the dals together in sufficient water for about 6 hours.
  • Drain the water and grind to a smooth and soft batter. Add the drained water a little at a time while grinding is necessary. 
  • Transfer the  batter to a bowl.  Add water if the batter is too thick.  Add salt and mix well.The final consistency of batter should thickly coat a spoon when dipped into it.
  • Set to ferment in a warm dark place.
  • Time to ferment depends on the room temperature. Usually take 6 – 8 hours on a warm day.
  • The quantity more than doubles upon fermentation.
  • Mix the batter well.
  • Heat a skillet at low flame and smear it with 1/2 a tsp of  ghee (I use an onion cut horizontally into half, to smear oil on the skillet. This tends to give a nice aroma to the dosas).
  • Pour batter on to the center of the hot skillet, and gently spread towards the outside in concentric circular movement using the base of the ladle to form a circular very thin crêpe.
  • Increase the flame to high.
  • When you start noticing a golden brown color on the sides and the top surface has the lost the wet look, Turn the dosa over.
  • Allow to roast for half a minute or so on this side.
  • Fold and take of the flame.
  • Reduce the flame and repeat the process to make the next dosa
  • Serve hot with coconut chutneys or sambar.
  • Vegetable Biryani- Chettinad Style


    2011
    03.31

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    Known to be the spiciest and the most aromatic cuisine of India, the Chettinad cuisine is one of my favorites. I’ve spent many glorious evenings in Chennai wiping away plates of Biryani and sucking on spicy succulent crab meat while my totally vegetarian best friend V, looked on with great amusing interest. I’m sure her smirk would disappear in a tick had she only known the great void (tragedy) her vegetarian life had conferred on her.

    Anyway, coming back to serious cooking,  here’s a vegetarian version of the popular Chettinad biryani which is so flavorful that I’m sure even a die hard meat eater would easily go for a second helping :) .

    Ingredients
    1 lb veggies of your choice. (I used, cauliflower and broccoli florets, diced bell peppers and carrots, peas and  potatoes cut into long strip like fries)
    3 cups basmati rice
    1 large  or 2 medium sized red onions finely sliced
    3 large tomatoes, diced in chunks 
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro/coriander leaves
    11/2 tbsp ginger garlic paste
    1 tbsp chopped mint 
    5 cloves
    4, 1/4 inch pieces of cinnamon
    2 bruised whole cardamom
    1/2 tsp red chili powder, alter this based on tolerable spice level
    2 tsp paprika, for color
    2 bay leaves
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder  
    refined vegetable oil
    2 tbsp ghee (clarified butter)
    3/4 cup coconut milk
    3/4 cup curd
    1 tsp lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    Spices for Grinding

    3 cloves
    2,1/4 inch pieces of cinnamon
    seeds from 1 cardamom
    1 tsp of fennel seeds

    Directions

  • Soak washed basmati rice with 4 cups of water and set aside for an hour. 
  • Dry roast the spices mentioned for grinding and grind to a semi coarse powder
  • Heat refined oil in a wide bottomed pan that can be fitted with a tight lid and doesn’t let steam escape and fry the veggies one at a time until almost cooked and set aside.
  • In the same pan add ghee and  add more oil if necessary,
  • When hot, add the whole cloves, cinnamon and cardamom and let them puff up.
  • Add the chopped onions and sauté until deep brown (the onions should look fried).
  • When the oil comes clear, move the onions to the sides of the pan and add turmeric and the ground spices to the oil accumulated at the center of the pan and sauté for 30 secs.
  • Add remaining ginger-garlic and sauté for a minute.
  • Add in the diced tomatoes, chili powders and sauté until oil separates.
  • Reduce the flame to low and add the coconut milk, curd, lemon, salt, cilantro and mint and let it simmer.
  • Add 1 tbsp of ghee, salt and cook the rice until the water boils and the rice is only  3/4 done.
  • Drop in the fried veggies into the masala mixture mix well and flatten it at he bottom of the pan
  • Pour in the boiling rice into the pan making the rice form a layer on top of the masala and veggie mixture and has no direct contact to the bottom of the pan.
  • Close the pan tight shut and let it sit on the very low flame for 15 – 20 min or until the rice at the top is done.
  • Remove from the stove and mix in the rice and masala
  • Serve with raitha and mango pickles.
  • Navratan Korma


    2011
    03.25

    Navratan Korma, meaning a mixture of nine gems is a delicious vegetarian dish from the Mughlai cuisine. The nine gems indicate the nine veggies, fruits and nuts that go into the dish. Influenced by the imperial kitchens of the Mughal empire this is as grand and as rich as any vegetarian dish can get.

    IMG_9085

    Ingredients

    10 oz of paneer/cottage cheese
    1/2 cup cashew nuts 
    1 large onion chopped
    1 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
    1/2 tsp cumin powder
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    1/2 tsp white pepper powder
    1 tsp punjabi garam masala
    1 1″ piece of cinnamon
    2 bay leaves
    1 pod of bruised cardamom
    4 cloves
    3-4 cups mixed veggies(I used cubed potatoes, chopped French beans, diced carrots,green peas,cauliflower florets, diced bell pepper)
    1/4 cup pineapple chunks
    10-12 raisins
    2-3 tbsp heavy cream
    2-3 tbsp refined oil
    Salt to taste

    Directions

  • Cut the paneer into slabs (not cubes) and toast them on both sides in a non stick pan in 1 tbsp of oil. Make sure you don’t over do it. Both the sides should have just a slight hint of brown to bring out the nutty flavor of the paneer.
  • When all the slabs of paneer are toasted cut them up into small cubes, sprinkle a little salt and set aside.
  • Grind 1/4th cup of the cashews along with the onions.
  • Parboil with salt all the veggies individually (cooking time for each varies) and set aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan.
  • Add turmeric and cumin powder and sautéfor 30 secs.
  • Add the remaining cashew nuts and the whole spices.
  • When the spices puff up add the cashew onion paste and the ginger garlic paste and sauté until oil separates.
  • Add the garam masala and pepper powder.
  • .Add one cup of water and bring to boil.
  • Add the the veggies, paneer, raisins and pine apple and let it simmer until the veggies are cooked.
  • Garnish with heavy cream
  • Server hot with Indian breads
  • Spicy Paddu


    2010
    09.23

    IMG_8586

    I always loved the lunches my best friend L got to school. Her Mom was a very good cook and I made sure L reserved a major portion of her lunch box for me. She was/is one of my closest of friends and there is no doubt I loved her company and always wished to hang out at her place irrespective of the food, that is. But, the fact that her Mom was an amazing cook only amplified the desire a tad bit more ;).
    These fried dumplings called Paddu sometimes came in L’s lunches and were coveted by  not just me but, by many of  our other avaricious friends as well. So, my dearest pal L, bless her sweet sweet heart, always saved a few extra for me in a safe place before she opened her box to the wild hungry wolves around us. And though I knew that my portion existed elsewhere, I still fought with the rest to get my split in this share of the treat as well;).  You see, greed is a vice I’ve had tough timing dealing with all my life :(.  Anyway, what is worth mentioning here though is that, it was not just with food that L made sure that I got more than I deserve. She’s been there for me as a close confidant all through my life. My preteens, teens and now well into my adulthood. And though today we live across the globe from each other, every time either of us are having a plate of these yummy dumplings we never fail to think back of the good times we shared.

    L in the last few years has been having more than her warranted share of problems in life. And to all or any of you who have taken the pains to read through my monologue here, I’d be grateful if you could spare a moment to send over some good thoughts, spirits and prayers her way. Not because L is my friend but because she is a genuinely nice person and totally totally deserves it.

    IMG_8544 

    Ingredients

    1/3 cup urad dal/black gram
    1 cup raw rice
    1 tsp fenugreek/methi seeds
    3 tbsp thin poha/parched (beaten) rice
    3 tbsp finely chopped cilantro
    2 sprigs of finely chopped curry leaves
    1 med sized onion finely chopped
    2 green chilies finely chopped
    salt to taste
    1/2 tsp finely chopped ginger

    Directions

  • Wash and soak dal, rice and fenugreek seeds for 5-6 hours.
  • Grind this mixture along with the parched rice to make a smooth batter.
  • Add salt and let the batter ferment overnight.
  • When adequately fermented the volume of the batter more than doubles its original volume
  • Add all the remaining ingredients into the batter and mix well.
  • On high flame grease the appakara (the mold used in making these dumplings) with oil.
  • Pour  1.5 tbsp full of batter  into each mold.
  • Reduce the flame to medium and let it cook for 3 – 4 minutes
  • When the bottom side is done, turn it over to the other side.
  • Drizzle a few drops of oil gain.
  • Let it cook for another 2 – 3 minutes
  • Remove from the pan and server hot with your choice of chutneys.
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    Simple Biryani with Whole Spices


    2010
    05.18

    The kitchen at my sister Sophie’s, is always open round the clock!. Ok, I take it back. There might be a quiet time between, say around 12 midnight to daybreak 5. But the rest of the time, a stove is always lit. It might not come as a surprise to you, knowing how greedy I am about food, that this is one among the many things I look forward to when I visit India. And like I have mentioned before, Sophie is a fine cook and I’m one of her biggest fans. This simple Biryani recipe that she often makes, uses whole spices and it is amazing how different, spices taste when ground, and when used as a whole.

     IMG_7329

    Ingredients
    1 lb skinless and boned chicken cut into medium sized pieces
    1 large  or 2 medium sized onions finely sliced
    4 large tomatoes, diced in chunks
    5- 6 green chilies, slit length wise
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 tbsp grated ginger
    2 tbsp diced garlic
    1/2 tsp black pepper corns
    8 cloves
    6, 1/4 inch pieces of cinnamon
    1/2 tsp whole fennel seeds/saunf
    3 cups jeera samba rice
    1/4 cup curd
    pinch of saffron
    refined vegetable oil
    2 tsp sesame oil or ghee (clarified butter)
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro/coriander leaves
    1 tbsp chopped mint
    1/2 tsp red chili powder, alter this based on tolerable spice level
    2 tbsp lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    Directions

  • Marinate the chicken in lemon juice, curd, turmeric, cloves, cinnamon, pepper corns, green chilies, chili powder, mint, cilantro  and salt over night in the fridge.
  • Soak washed rice with 5 cups of water and set aside for an hour.
  • Heat 2 – 3 tbsp of oil  in a wide bottomed  hollow pan, make sure the pan can be fitted with a tight lid that doesn’t let steam escape.
  • Add fennel, and let it splutter.
  • Add 3/4th of the chopped onions and sauté until golden brown.
  • Crush the grated ginger and garlic and add them to the pan along with the green chilies and continue to sauté for 5 minutes.
  • Add in the diced tomatoes and sauté until oil separates.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Add in the chicken along with the marinade and sauté for 5 -10 minutes and then reduce the flame to low let it cook until chicken is done.
  • Add 2 tbsp of sesame oil or ghee, salt and cook the rice until the water boils and the rice is only  3/4 done.
  • Gather all the chicken and the masala mixture together and flatten it at he bottom of the pan
  • Dissolve a pinch of saffron in 2 tbsp of milk and add to the boiling rice and mix it.
  • Pour in the boiling rice into the pan making the rice form a layer on top of the masala and has no direct contact to the bottom of the pan.
  • Close the pan tight shut and let it sit on the very low flame for 15 – 20 min or until the rice at the top is done.
  • Remove from the stove and mix in the rice and masala
  • Deep fry the remaining sliced onion and sprinkle on the rice as garnish.
  • Serve with raitha or baingan masaledar.
  • Mexican Rice with Bell Peppers


    2010
    03.28

    IMG_5934

    This rice was my saving grace when I was pregnant with Nish. Though horribly nauseous all the time, I still craved for rice. Now, don”t ask me how that works. Apparently, nausea and craving go hand in hand during those most confusing months in the lives of many women. While I longed for rice, I was put off by the smell of any kind of rice preparation. In his desperate quest to find something to plug the whining gob of his wife, Roy, discovered that the Mexican Rice did the trick. It got him at least a couple of hours of relief from her  incessant annoying drone and heaving. I think it had to do with how simple the rice is. Everything about it is subtle. Perfect for a preggy’s oversensitive olfactory system.

    Called arroz, which means rice,  it is served along side the main dish. It can be made with or without the vegetables. I usually use vegetables to keep it healthy, but limit it to just one kind. That helps retain its identity and not over power the dish.

    Ingredients

    1 cup long grain rice
    2 cloves of garlic, diced fine
    1/2 cup of onion, chopped fine
    1/2 cup puréed tomato (I prefer to use the can since the sauce is more dense)
    2 cups chicken broth (or vegetable stock)
    1/2 cup of bell peppers diced small
    2 –3 tbsp extra virgin olive oil
    1 chopped pickled jalapeno (optional)
    2 tbsp chopped fresh cilantro

    Directions

  • Heat oil in a heavy bottomed pan.
  • Add in the rice and sauté over medium heat for a minute or two until the rice is nicely toasted.
  • Add onions, garlic, jalapeno and bell peppers and sauté for a minute or until the onions turn translucent
  • Pour in the chicken broth and tomato purée and bring to boil.
  • Reduce the flame to low, tightly shut the pan and let it simmer for about 15 – 20 minutes till the rice is cooked.
  • Fluff up the rice gently using a fork. Garnish with cilantro and serve hot.
  • Chinese Egg Fried Rice


    2010
    03.13

    IMG_5516

    The trick to getting fried rice, to smell and taste like the ‘Chinese’ kind, is to add the rice when the eggs are 1/2 done. This allows the eggs to stick to the rice grains, forming an unusual aroma and taste, very typical of Chinese fried rice. For me, while making fried rice, eggs, spring onions, peas, carrots and celery are a must have. Everything else you can do with or without. I also refrigerate the cooked rice for a couple of hours before the actual preparation, because I never seem to have left over rice, like the popular advice declares.

    Ingredients.

    2 cups jasmine rice or any other long grain rice
    4 cups of chicken stock or vegetable stock
    4 tbsp oyster sauce
    4 tbsp soy sauce
    2 eggs, beaten
    2 tbsp peanut oil
    2 tbsp toasted sesame oil
    11/2 cups of mixed vegetables (peas, carrots, celery etc)
    4 tbsp spring onion
    2 garlic cloves, minced
    salt and  white pepper to taste

    Directions

  • Cook the rice with 4 cups of chicken stock, 2 tbsp of soy sauce and 2 tbsp of sesame oil and salt to taste. Refrigerate for 2  – 3 hours.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of peanut oil in a wok.
  • Add garlic and sauté for about  15 –20 seconds, just about till the garlic begins to cook.
  • Add the mixed vegetables and  stir-fry for 2 to 3 minutes.
  • Remove the vegetables and set aside.
  • Heat 1 tbsp of peanut oil in the same wok.
  • Add the eggs and stir constantly. When the eggs are about half done, add in the rice. Make sure you fluff up the rice using your fingers before you add it into the wok. Stir well until the egg is cooked.
  • Add in the remaining sauces, stir-fried vegetables and spring onions. Mix well. Add pepper and adjust salt to taste. Turn off the flame.
  • Serve with any meat or vegetable side.
  • Mushroom Biryani


    2010
    02.22

    mushroombiryani

    If ever due to some freak occurrence or if at some blessed moment, better judgment were to prevail upon me and I were to turn 100% vegetarian, then in all my recipes, where ever there would be a need for the life of an innocent living creature, I would use  mushrooms instead. Mushrooms to me are the next of kin in taste, for all kinds of meats. I know, I know, there is tofu, I’ve heard nothing is impossible with tofu  and of course I wont deny tofu can help you survive if the sun disappears! But, I simply DONT do tofu. It is my pet peeve when it comes to food. And I’d safely leave it at that. I’m still a greenhorn to blogging and I’m not ready yet, for the scorn of the Internet (may be in a years time I’ll detail out the whys of my dislike ;))

    So my dear veggie friends, if you have been wondering what all this fuss is about  the biryanis, the meat lovers are every so often raving about, try out a biryani recipe and replace the meat with your favorite kind of mushroom. If you like it, you are very close to knowing what all the revelry is about. And, if you don’t like it, you can rest assured, that us blood thirsty sinners are having it no better than you already are.

    In my biryani recipe I mostly use Portobello mushrooms. I find them hearty, earthy and very flavorful, a perfect replacement for meat. You can go ahead and use  any kind you like or have. You wont be disappointed.

    mushroombiryani2

    Ingredients
    1 lb mushrooms of your choice, cut into bite sizes chunks
    1 large  or 2 medium sized onions finely sliced
    4 large tomatoes, diced in chunks
    5- 6 green chilies, slit length wise
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 tbsp grated ginger
    2 tbsp diced garlic
    1/2 tsp black pepper corns
    1/2 tsp 3 Cs spice mix
    3 cups basmati rice
    pinch of saffron
    refined vegetable oil
    2 tsp sesame oil or ghee (clarified butter)
    2 tbsp chopped cilantro/coriander leaves
    1 tbsp chopped mint
    1 cup coconut milk
    1/2 tsp red chili powder, alter this based on tolerable spice level
    1 tsp lemon juice
    Salt to taste

    Directions

    • Soak washed basmati rice with 5 cups of water and set aside for an hour.
    • Sauté 3/4th of the chopped onions in 2 – 3 tbsp of oil  in a wide bottomed  hollow pan  until golden brown; make sure the pan can be fitted with a tight lid that doesn’t let steam escape.
    • Crush the grated ginger and garlic and add them to the pan along with the green chilies and continue to sauté for 5 minutes.
    • Add in the diced tomatoes, turmeric powder, spice mix, pepper corns, chili powder, chopped mint and cilantro and continue to sauté until oil separates.
    • Add salt to taste
    • Add in the mushrooms and sauté until they are cooked. Then reduce the flame to low.
    • Add one cup of coconut milk, lemon juice, salt and 2 tbsp of sesame oil or ghee to the rice soaking in water and then set to cook until the water boils and the rice is only  3/4 done.
    • Gather all the mushroom and the masala mixture together and flatten it at he bottom of the pan.
    • Dissolve a pinch of saffron in 2 tbsp of milk and add to the boiling rice and mix it.
    • Pour in the boiling rice into the pan making the rice form a layer on top of the masala and has no direct contact to the bottom of the pan.
    • Close the pan tight shut and let it sit on the very low flame for 15 – 20 min or until the rice at the top is done.
    • Remove from the stove and mix in the rice and masala
    • Deep fry the remaining sliced onion and sprinkle on the rice as garnish.
    • Serve with raitha or baingan masaledar.

    Lemon Rice


    2010
    01.23

    I had this argument  with my best friend V, who was insistent, it was rather stupid that I post this recipe. Now, arguing for both of us is second nature. And in spite of the fact that most of our phone calls have only grunts and swearing and eventual slamming down of the phones, we remain to this day the thickest of friends. I’m sorry to digress, but I had to tell you that, though I am aware of my seemingly innate habit to bicker, I am 101 percent sure she couldn’t be more wrong and I more right, in this squabble.

    For one, I don’t think posting this recipe is a stupid idea. Two- V, with her pedigree from Tamil Nadu, must have had all forms of lemon rice every other day and might be able to whip it up in her sleep. But, majority of the world and my friends are not.  And I think, if not all, at least a handful of them would be interested and curious to know the recipe. So V, when you see this, hit the humph button and move on. And to those who are interested here it goes.

    lemon200

    Lemon rice is a quick fix dish. It is usually associated with long train rides or picnics in the south of India because it can be eaten cold, stays pretty fresh for long periods and doesn’t spoil easy.  This recipe mainly calls for white rice and lemons. Every  ingredient for seasoning barring [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product] and curry leaves are optional. There are many variations in making this. Some add onions, others add grated ginger and some garnish with coconut. My secret ingredient to herald the symphony – lemon zest, when I have fresh lemons, or finely sliced pickled lemon rinds that I spoke about earlier here. I’d also like to mention that while making any form of South Indian recipes for fried rices, it makes a world of difference when you use [amazon-product type=”text” text=”sesame oil”]B000MXVH3O[/amazon-product] (the golden, cold-pressed kind. Not the dark brown from toasted seeds found in the Chinese market), instead of ordinary refined oil.

    Ingredients
    4 cups of cooked white rice.
    2 tbsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”sesame oil”]B000MXVH3O[/amazon-product]  / ghee (clarified butter)
    a pinch of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”asafoetida”]B000JMAXOW[/amazon-product]
    2 dried red chilies – crumbled into 1’’ pieces
    1 tbsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”split black gram”]B000K8CIZW[/amazon-product] /urad dal (optional)
    1 tbsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”split Bengal gram”]B000K8949A[/amazon-product]/chana dal (optional)
    1/4 tsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”fenugreek seeds”]B000RHSW10[/amazon-product](optional)
    1/2 cup of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”unsalted peanuts”]B002KB440O[/amazon-product]
    1 tsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”black mustard seeds”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product]
    1 sprig of curry leaves
    3 – 4  tbsp fresh lemon juice
    1/2 tsp lemon zest (optional)
    1/4 tsp of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
    1 tbsp of grated fresh coconut (optional)
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Dry roast the [amazon-product type=”text” text=”peanuts”]B002KB440O[/amazon-product]
    and set aside.
  • Fluff up the cooked rice using a fork or your fingers. (If you are using bare hands applying a little oil to your palms make it less sticky.)
  • Heat oil/ghee in a shallow wide pan.
  • Add a pinch of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”asafoetida”]B000JMAXOW[/amazon-product].
  • Add chilies,[amazon-product type=”text” text=”split black gram”]B000K8CIZW[/amazon-product], [amazon-product type=”text” text=”split Bengal gram”]B000K8949A[/amazon-product] and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”fenugreek seeds”]B000RHSW10[/amazon-product]. sauté until it all turns golden brown. 
  • Add mustard seeds. When the [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard seeds”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product] pop, add curry leaves.
  • Add peanuts and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product] and sauté for a minute.
  • Add cooked rice, salt and lemon juice and mix well.
  • Add salt to taste.
  • Garnish with grated coconut and lemon zest.
  • A Simple Indian Meal


    2010
    01.19

    My American neighbor L, like many of my other American friends, is always asking me how we Indians manage to keep so fit in spite of all the rich good food we seem to be hogging. She was (is?) under the impression that we always ate Samosas, Briyanis, creamy Koftas, fried Masala Chicken and stuffed Paranthas on a daily basis. It took me some work to convince her that though these elaborate delicacies were always in the menus at the parties we Indians kept throwing every so often, our everyday meals were very simple and down to earth.

    lunch

    Simple Indian Meal: Rice, Roti, Masoor Dal, Egg Masala, Paapad, Okra Masala & Sautéed Tindora

    The staple diet of most Indians consists of Rice or Roti (Indian bread made of whole wheat)  or both. They are usually eaten in combination with vegetables, lentils, yogurt &/or meat/poultry/seafood.

    Dal (Lentils)

    dal

    Dal (pulses/legumes) can be made as simple or as complicated as possible. A simple Dal recipe mainly [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

    Bhindi Masala (Okra Masala)

    b

    A perfect Bhindi Masala should not be slimy and sticky. And the only way to make it that way is to pat dry the Okras after washing them [read more]

     

     

     

     

     

     Jalapeno Tomato Onion Egg Masala

    egg masala

    This delicately spicy dish serves very well with all kinds of breads. The secret to getting  the gravy really thick and just right, is to use a lot of onions. I’ve also used [read more]

     

     

      

     

     Sautéed Tindora – Sautéed Ivy Gourd

    TindooraThis is a favorite vegetable among most Keralites and they have a number of ways of cooking it. I like it best in this form [read more]