Posts Tagged ‘Salmon’

Pan Roasted Salmon / Kerala fish Fry


2010
01.27

fish2

Every time I’m at the fish mongers’, I cannot get myself to pass by the salmon without dropping a pound or two of it in my cart. Salmon is my favorite among all the fish. This does not mean I like other fish any less. No, I actually love them all. With an untainted genealogy of blood thirsty Mallus, I, but obviously, devour all of the sea world with great relish and gusto. I’d maybe wipe up the salmon a tad bit faster though ;).

Salmon tastes the least bit fishy to me and hence allows me a lot of room to cook it any which way I want. Though we never did salmon in India, I was surprised that it tasted amazing in all Indian recipes. Fish is a staple for most meat eating Malayalees and we usually have a number of ways of cooking it. But I find the ‘Kerala fish fry’ to be the tastiest and easiest of them all.

There are just 5 basic ingredients for this fried fish marinade – ginger, garlic, chili, turmeric and salt. Everything else you add are just enhancers or taste boosters as I would like to call them. I grill or roast them in a non stick pan with very little oil.  I can feel big nods of disapproval when I use the word ‘non stick’. But I find, while working with eggs or fish, nothing serves you better than a non stick pan. You just need to use it right. Teflon allows you to use very little oil and the food doesn’t burn up on you (which is more of a carcinogen if you ask me) . Just make sure you cook in low to medium heat and use wooden utensils on it. The pan I use for my eggs and fish, I’ve had for years and there is not a single scratch or blemish on it (of course I’ve had to hide it away when my Mom visits;)).

  fish

Ingredients
1 lb salmon (any firm wish will taste just as great!), sliced into desired sizes
1 1/2 tbsp of fresh ginger garlic paste ( ginger and garlic in a 1:1 ratio)
1 tsp chili powder (base it on tolerable spice levels)
1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
1/2 tsp black ground pepper
salt to taste
1 tsp of lime juice (optional)
a sprig or 2 of curry leaves (optional)
[amazon-product type=”text” text=”coconut oil”]B002DGNP10[/amazon-product]/refined vegetable oil for roasting.

Directions

  • Marinate the cut pieces of fish with a tsp of lime juice and set aside.
  • Mix all the spices with ginger-garlic and salt  to make a thick smooth paste. The marinade should be slightly on the saltier side.
  • Apply the paste on all pieces of fish making sure all sides are completely coated by a thin layer of marinade.
  • Set it aside for 30 mins or so.
  • Heat oil/[amazon-product type=”text” text=”coconut oil”]B002DGNP10[/amazon-product]in a shallow non stick pan and  slide in the pieces one at a time.
  • Roast on medium heat and flip the pieces to other side after 2-3 min or when you see the fish is 3/4 cooked from the bottom.
  • The time you let to roast on each side depends on the size of each piece and how crisp you would like it to be.
  • When done palce the pieces in paper towel to soak up any extra oil.
  • Garnish with  ground pepper and fried curry leaves.
  • Kappa and Meen Curry / Tapioca with Curried fish


    2010
    01.24

    The 80s in one of India’s finest cities, Bangalore, wasn’t easy for me as a child of two  Malayalee immigrants.  I hated that we stood out starkly among the rest, the natives and the other immigrants from elsewhere included. I was a vain kid to say the least, and keeping up with appearances was among the top most in my priorities then. I had lots of misgivings about my background. And try as I did, it was hard for me to conceal the huge gulf between ‘us’ and the rest. What with a nosey grandma sporting the traditional Syrian Christian attire, her all white dress of Chatta and Mundu with a pleated tail,  three huge coconut trees in our small garden that loudly shouted ‘Malayalee’ to the arid Bangalore skies, endless number of  Mundu clad UnGles, and AnDies with hair slicked in strong smelling coconut oil, visiting us from Kerala every so often, our odd furniture at home that never matched the drapes, our lunch boxes packed every other day with Puttu-Kadal  and the like, and not to forget the most thwarting of all – the infamous lingual problems of pure Malayalees – I cringed every time my parents spoke in their thick accent to a neighbor or a friend of mine. All these and many more inane differences agonized my amorphous little mind, and at times I longed to miraculously disappear and be born again in a Sambar and Rice eating house hold.

    knf

    My parents both, well educated and well read, worked decent jobs and tried hard to provide fairly for their four girls. Three of their own and one their niece, my cousin J. Oblivious of their youngest’s desperate woes, they persevered in their own ways to instill in their girls a pride for their heritage and an abiltiy to connect with their roots. And as a part of this agenda they made sure we spent every summer at our ancestral home in Kerala  bonding with our extended family.

    Of course this part I loved. What was not to love in that exotic paradise,  where I swam all day in blissful abandon in those crystal clear streams, where there was only green everywhere and the other colors were forced to shy away, where my grandparents pampered me like I were the princess of Persia and the only the chores I had to do was eat and sleep. With countless cousins hovering around me there was no dearth for playmates and I loved the candid risky trips I took with them to the local cinema hall, that played Malayalam comedies but always ran a full house. The problem my ingenious adventurous cousins quickly solved by making us carry our own chairs to sit.

    With all this fun, I wished dearly that the holidays days never end. But they always did. And, we had to go back to the city, my home, where I was transformed yet again into that silly Mallu spiting child.

    And then I grew up. Growing up thankfully peeled off my false pretenses and without my jaundiced glasses I found diversity all around me. I realized that, in spite of all the eccentricities every culture was guilty of, its people couldn’t help but be proud of their ethnicity. Unfounded were my niggles as a child and I too eventually couldn’t help but  embrace with pride, the Malayalee in me.

    This post is for my little boy N, born to immigrant parents and growing up in a land were all dreams are said to come true. I hope in his quest for wanting to belong, he finds an identity that he can be proud of. Be it as an American, an Indian or as a Malayalee.

    Kappa Puzhukku / Mashed Tapioca

    kappaKappa (tapioca) and Meen (fish) curry or like a Malayalee  would say it ‘kappa puzhukku end meen gurry’ is so [read more]

     

     

     

     

     Meen Curry / Kerala Red Fish Curry

    fishcurry

    The distinguishing character of this spicy hot red curried fish is the smoky sourness rendered to the fish and the gravy from the kudampulli [read more]

     

     

     

     

    Kerala Meen Curry – Kerala Red Fish Curry


    2010
    01.24

    The distinguishing character of this spicy hot red  fish curry, is the smoky sourness rendered to the fish and the gravy from the kudampulli-dried and smoked fruit rinds of the camboge tree. In Kerala, fish is traditionally cooked in an earthen pot that provides a distinct flavor to the curry.

    fishcurry

    This dish is best served with Kappa or white rice. In my family we even ate it with rotis (Indian bread) and I must say, though it sounds odd, it is a wonderful combination.

    Ingredients

    1 lb fish cut into small pieces
    2 tsp red chili powder (base it on tolerable  spice levels)
    1 tsp paprika (mainly for the red color) 
    1/4 tsp fenugreek seed powder
    3 –4 shallots finely sliced (if you don’t have these you can use one med sized onion) 
    1.5 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
    2 kudampulli (camboge fruit rinds)
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    2 –3 tbsp coconut oil /any vegetable refined oil
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Soak kudampulli in a cup of hot salt water and set aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan and add black mustard seeds, when they pop add in the curry leaves and powdered fenugreek.
  • Add sliced shallot and sauté till golden brown.
  • Add  ginger-garlic paste and sauté till oil separates.
  • Mix together chili powder, paprika and turmeric powder in a little warm water to make a smooth paste, add to the pan and sauté for a few minutes.
  • Add soaked kudampulli along with the water and allow it to boil for a few minutes.
  • Add the fish pieces.
  • Close the lid and let it boil it again.
  • Once the water boils, reduce the flame and let it simmer for about 5– 10 minutes until the fish is cooked. Add more water if desired.
  • Season again with 2 finely sliced shallots fried deep in 1 tsp of coconut oil, mustard and curry leaves if desired.
  • Serve with Rice or Kappa
  • Kerala Meen Curry – Kerala Red Fish Curry


    2010
    01.24

    The distinguishing character of this spicy hot red  fish curry, is the smoky sourness rendered to the fish and the gravy from the kudampulli-dried and smoked fruit rinds of the camboge tree. In Kerala, fish is traditionally cooked in an earthen pot that provides a distinct flavor to the curry.

    fishcurry

    This dish is best served with Kappa or white rice. In my family we even ate it with rotis (Indian bread) and I must say, though it sounds odd, it is a wonderful combination.

    Ingredients

    1 lb fish cut into small pieces
    2 tsp red chili powder (base it on tolerable  spice levels)
    1 tsp paprika (mainly for the red color) 
    1/4 tsp fenugreek seed powder
    3 –4 shallots finely sliced (if you don’t have these you can use one med sized onion) 
    1.5 tbsp ginger-garlic paste
    2 kudampulli (camboge fruit rinds)
    1/2 tsp turmeric powder
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    1/2 tsp black mustard seeds
    2 –3 tbsp coconut oil /any vegetable refined oil
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Soak kudampulli in a cup of hot salt water and set aside.
  • Heat oil in a pan and add black mustard seeds, when they pop add in the curry leaves and powdered fenugreek.
  • Add sliced shallot and sauté till golden brown.
  • Add  ginger-garlic paste and sauté till oil separates.
  • Mix together chili powder, paprika and turmeric powder in a little warm water to make a smooth paste, add to the pan and sauté for a few minutes.
  • Add soaked kudampulli along with the water and allow it to boil for a few minutes.
  • Add the fish pieces.
  • Close the lid and let it boil it again.
  • Once the water boils, reduce the flame and let it simmer for about 5– 10 minutes until the fish is cooked. Add more water if desired.
  • Season again with 2 finely sliced shallots fried deep in 1 tsp of coconut oil, mustard and curry leaves if desired.
  • Serve with Rice or Kappa