Posts Tagged ‘Semolina’

Rava Idli / Sooji Idli / Steamed And Spiced Semolina Dumplings


2010
03.09

IMG_5319

Remember sometime back, when I’d confessed about my addiction here? Well, it had been a couple of weeks since then and my cravings had begun to creep up again. So, instead of making Rava dosas like last time, I decided on the easier, rava idlis. Obviously, the lesser work involved the more happy I am. And since I put loads of veggies in my idlis. I like to think the lazier me provides healthier options for my family ;).

Ingredients

1 cup coarse rava
2 cups sour curd/yogurt
1 tbsp chopped cilantro
2 tbsp chopped curry leaves
1/2 cup mixed veggies (I use finely diced tomatoes, grated carrots and slightly cooked peas)
5 – 6 tbsp of clarified butter(ghee)
1/2 tsp grated and crushed ginger
1 tsp bengal gram(channa dal)
1/4 tsp mustard seeds
1tbsp chopped cashew nuts
1/2 tbsp chopped green chilies (optional)
1/4 tsp baking soda (optional)
few whole cashew nuts to place on top of the idlis for aesthetics
salt to taste

IMG_5309

Directions

  • Dry roast the semolina till it is slightly toasted and emits a  a nice aroma.
  • Heat ghee in a pan, add mustard seeds, dal, chopped nuts, curry leaves and sauté.
  • When the mustard pops, add ginger and green chilies, and sauté for a minute.
  •  Switch off the heat add the toasted semolina and mix well.
  • Add salt, soda, carrot, coriander leaves, yogurt and mix well.
  • Let it to settle for 30mins.
  • Grease an idli stand with ghee, place a cashew nut at the center of each depression and then and then pour in the mixture on top of the nut.
  • Steam for around 15-20mins.
  • Serve hot with coconut chutney or sambar.
  • Rava Dosai / Sooji Dosa/ Spiced Semolina Crêpes


    2010
    02.12

    rava dosa20

    Like all typical South Indians, a couple of weeks without dosas or idlis, and my body flails frenzied from intense withdrawal symptoms. Initially nothing seemed to cure these pangs other than a salver of the fermented pancakes or the puffed dumplings. But soon the fact, that I had to grapple for myself and my lazy ass showed no compassion when it came to work, my body learned to settle, for if not the same, but equally good member of the aforesaid clan. Same name, just an added prefix -‘Rava’.

    Yes, Rava dosa is my saving grace when my senses are over powered with crapulous lust for some good South Indian gratification and my spirits, as always, are too weak (lazy?) to do much about it. Unlike the typical dosas, that take almost an entire day to make, considering the soaking, grinding and waiting to ferment period, this comes together in a matter of minutes if you are lucky to have some really sour curd/buttermilk at hand. If not, don’t fret. Just keep the batter in a warm place for an hour or two and voila, they are ready to be poured onto a hot skillet.

    Like most other Indian dishes, this too has a number of variations in the recipes. The basic ingredients are mostly rice flour, semolina/sooji/rava, wheat flour and buttermilk.  You can really go berserk with the seasoning. If you think it might taste nice, the chances are, it definitely will. That is how accommodating this dish is.

    A very hot skillet and very watery batter is the secret to the gossamer weave  finish of a semolina crêpe.

    rava dosa on the skillet2

    Ingredients

    ½  cup rice flour
    ½ cup rava /sooji /semolina
    1 tbsp wheat flour
    1 green chili finely chopped
    ½  tsp whole ground pepper
    2 –3 curry leaves chopped fine
    ½ tsp ginger grated on a micro plane
    1 tsp cilantro chopped fine
    big pinch of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”asafoetida”]B000JMAXOW[/amazon-product]
    1 small onion chopped fine
    [amazon-product type=”text” text=”sesame oil”]B000MXVH3O[/amazon-product] or ghee(clarified butter)
    ½ cup sour butter milk or ¼ curd
    2– 3 cups of water depending on how watery you want the batter to be
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Crush (not grind) the whole black pepper and mix it with all the ingredients except oil to form a nice watery batter and set aside for 30 minutes.
  • Add more water if the batter gets thick once the semolina swells up.
  • Heat a skillet at high flame and smear it with 1/2 a tsp of oil (I use an onion cut horizontally into half, to smear oil on the skillet. This tends to give a nice aroma to the dosas).
  • Pour batter on the hot skillet, forming a circle from the outside and gradually filling up the insides.
  • Drizzle a little oil or ghee on the side and on the inside where ever you see tiny holes.
  • When you start noticing a golden brown color, Turn the dosa over.
  • Serve hot with sambar or any spicy chutneys.
  •  

    IMG_4848

    Rava Dosai / Sooji Dosa/ Spiced Semolina Crêpes


    2010
    02.12

    rava dosa20

    Like all typical South Indians, a couple of weeks without dosas or idlis, and my body flails frenzied from intense withdrawal symptoms. Initially nothing seemed to cure these pangs other than a salver of the fermented pancakes or the puffed dumplings. But soon the fact, that I had to grapple for myself and my lazy ass showed no compassion when it came to work, my body learned to settle, for if not the same, but equally good member of the aforesaid clan. Same name, just an added prefix -‘Rava’.

    Yes, Rava dosa is my saving grace when my senses are over powered with crapulous lust for some good South Indian gratification and my spirits, as always, are too weak (lazy?) to do much about it. Unlike the typical dosas, that take almost an entire day to make, considering the soaking, grinding and waiting to ferment period, this comes together in a matter of minutes if you are lucky to have some really sour curd/buttermilk at hand. If not, don’t fret. Just keep the batter in a warm place for an hour or two and voila, they are ready to be poured onto a hot skillet.

    Like most other Indian dishes, this too has a number of variations in the recipes. The basic ingredients are mostly rice flour, semolina/sooji/rava, wheat flour and buttermilk.  You can really go berserk with the seasoning. If you think it might taste nice, the chances are, it definitely will. That is how accommodating this dish is.

    A very hot skillet and very watery batter is the secret to the gossamer weave  finish of a semolina crêpe.

    rava dosa on the skillet2

    Ingredients

    ½  cup rice flour
    ½ cup rava /sooji /semolina
    1 tbsp wheat flour
    1 green chili finely chopped
    ½  tsp whole ground pepper
    2 –3 curry leaves chopped fine
    ½ tsp ginger grated on a micro plane
    1 tsp cilantro chopped fine
    big pinch of [amazon-product type=”text” text=”asafoetida”]B000JMAXOW[/amazon-product]
    1 small onion chopped fine
    [amazon-product type=”text” text=”sesame oil”]B000MXVH3O[/amazon-product] or ghee(clarified butter)
    ½ cup sour butter milk or ¼ curd
    2– 3 cups of water depending on how watery you want the batter to be
    salt to taste

    Directions

  • Crush (not grind) the whole black pepper and mix it with all the ingredients except oil to form a nice watery batter and set aside for 30 minutes.
  • Add more water if the batter gets thick once the semolina swells up.
  • Heat a skillet at high flame and smear it with 1/2 a tsp of oil (I use an onion cut horizontally into half, to smear oil on the skillet. This tends to give a nice aroma to the dosas).
  • Pour batter on the hot skillet, forming a circle from the outside and gradually filling up the insides.
  • Drizzle a little oil or ghee on the side and on the inside where ever you see tiny holes.
  • When you start noticing a golden brown color, Turn the dosa over.
  • Serve hot with sambar or any spicy chutneys.
  •  

    IMG_4848