Posts Tagged ‘Tapioca’

Chenda Kappa and Mulagu Chammanthi/ Boiled Tapioca with Green Chili Chutney – Kerala Style


2010
07.28

IMG_7666

Whoever said life’s finer pleasures are in simple things couldn’t be more right. And when the adage is applied to food I would bold, underline and increase it to the biggest font possible. There are foods that I could eat anytime of the day and everyday if it were allowed.  And this, is one of them. The green chili chutney is what does it for me. As a child my mother served this chutney with all forms of boiled or steamed roots and tubers like sweet potatoes, yams, tapioca etc. And that was when I think I inherited my love for the sweet tangy and spicy combos.

Note: You cannot replace shallots with onions in this recipe as it takes the taste to a whole different direction.

Green chili Chutney

Ingredients

10 shallots roughly chopped
10 hot green chilies roughly chopped
1/4 tsp of tamarind paste
1 tbsp coconut oil
salt to taste
1  curry leaf

Directions

  • Grind shallots, green chilies, tamarind and curry leaf to a coarse mixture with a chunky texture.
  • Drizzle with coconut oil and mix well.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve with hot kappa or yams.

    Cooking Instructions for Tapioca

    Depending on the quality of the tapioca the cooking time varies. So it is safer to cook this in an open pan with salted boiling water rather than a pressure cooker. This allows you to check on it with a fork in regular intervals. Cooked tapioca should be soft and tender right through.

  • Chenda Kappa and Mulagu Chammanthi/ Boiled Tapioca with Green Chili Chutney – Kerala Style


    2010
    07.28

    IMG_7666

    Whoever said life’s finer pleasures are in simple things couldn’t be more right. And when the adage is applied to food I would bold, underline and increase it to the biggest font possible. There are foods that I could eat anytime of the day and everyday if it were allowed.  And this, is one of them. The green chili chutney is what does it for me. As a child my mother served this chutney with all forms of boiled or steamed roots and tubers like sweet potatoes, yams, tapioca etc. And that was when I think I inherited my love for the sweet tangy and spicy combos.

    Note: You cannot replace shallots with onions in this recipe as it takes the taste to a whole different direction.

    Green chili Chutney

    Ingredients

    10 shallots roughly chopped
    10 hot green chilies roughly chopped
    1/4 tsp of tamarind paste
    1 tbsp coconut oil
    salt to taste
    1  curry leaf

    Directions

  • Grind shallots, green chilies, tamarind and curry leaf to a coarse mixture with a chunky texture.
  • Drizzle with coconut oil and mix well.
  • Add salt to taste
  • Serve with hot kappa or yams.

    Cooking Instructions for Tapioca

    Depending on the quality of the tapioca the cooking time varies. So it is safer to cook this in an open pan with salted boiling water rather than a pressure cooker. This allows you to check on it with a fork in regular intervals. Cooked tapioca should be soft and tender right through.

  • Kappa and Meen Curry / Tapioca with Curried fish


    2010
    01.24

    The 80s in one of India’s finest cities, Bangalore, wasn’t easy for me as a child of two  Malayalee immigrants.  I hated that we stood out starkly among the rest, the natives and the other immigrants from elsewhere included. I was a vain kid to say the least, and keeping up with appearances was among the top most in my priorities then. I had lots of misgivings about my background. And try as I did, it was hard for me to conceal the huge gulf between ‘us’ and the rest. What with a nosey grandma sporting the traditional Syrian Christian attire, her all white dress of Chatta and Mundu with a pleated tail,  three huge coconut trees in our small garden that loudly shouted ‘Malayalee’ to the arid Bangalore skies, endless number of  Mundu clad UnGles, and AnDies with hair slicked in strong smelling coconut oil, visiting us from Kerala every so often, our odd furniture at home that never matched the drapes, our lunch boxes packed every other day with Puttu-Kadal  and the like, and not to forget the most thwarting of all – the infamous lingual problems of pure Malayalees – I cringed every time my parents spoke in their thick accent to a neighbor or a friend of mine. All these and many more inane differences agonized my amorphous little mind, and at times I longed to miraculously disappear and be born again in a Sambar and Rice eating house hold.

    knf

    My parents both, well educated and well read, worked decent jobs and tried hard to provide fairly for their four girls. Three of their own and one their niece, my cousin J. Oblivious of their youngest’s desperate woes, they persevered in their own ways to instill in their girls a pride for their heritage and an abiltiy to connect with their roots. And as a part of this agenda they made sure we spent every summer at our ancestral home in Kerala  bonding with our extended family.

    Of course this part I loved. What was not to love in that exotic paradise,  where I swam all day in blissful abandon in those crystal clear streams, where there was only green everywhere and the other colors were forced to shy away, where my grandparents pampered me like I were the princess of Persia and the only the chores I had to do was eat and sleep. With countless cousins hovering around me there was no dearth for playmates and I loved the candid risky trips I took with them to the local cinema hall, that played Malayalam comedies but always ran a full house. The problem my ingenious adventurous cousins quickly solved by making us carry our own chairs to sit.

    With all this fun, I wished dearly that the holidays days never end. But they always did. And, we had to go back to the city, my home, where I was transformed yet again into that silly Mallu spiting child.

    And then I grew up. Growing up thankfully peeled off my false pretenses and without my jaundiced glasses I found diversity all around me. I realized that, in spite of all the eccentricities every culture was guilty of, its people couldn’t help but be proud of their ethnicity. Unfounded were my niggles as a child and I too eventually couldn’t help but  embrace with pride, the Malayalee in me.

    This post is for my little boy N, born to immigrant parents and growing up in a land were all dreams are said to come true. I hope in his quest for wanting to belong, he finds an identity that he can be proud of. Be it as an American, an Indian or as a Malayalee.

    Kappa Puzhukku / Mashed Tapioca

    kappaKappa (tapioca) and Meen (fish) curry or like a Malayalee  would say it ‘kappa puzhukku end meen gurry’ is so [read more]

     

     

     

     

     Meen Curry / Kerala Red Fish Curry

    fishcurry

    The distinguishing character of this spicy hot red curried fish is the smoky sourness rendered to the fish and the gravy from the kudampulli [read more]

     

     

     

     

    Kappa Puzhukku / Mashed Tapioca


    2010
    01.24

    Kappa (tapioca) and Meen (fish) curry or like a Malayalee  would say ‘kappa puzhukku aend meen gurry’, is so characteristic to Kerala that I can vouch a million bucks, you wouldn’t find it anywhere else in the world unless there was a Malaylee or an influence of one within a hundred feet. The best part about kappa is that it has no boundaries in every sense of the term. It is a delicacy for both the rich and the poor. It can be served at anytime of the day, as breakfast, lunch or dinner, or even as an in between snack. It can be eaten all by itself or in combination with anything you can possibly imagine.  This is my all time favorite meal. It reminds me of the wonderful summers I spent with my amazing family in God’s Own Country.

    kappa

    Ingredients:

    2 lb peeled and diced tapioca
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product]
    1/3 -1/2 cup fresh grated coconut
    1/2 tsp [amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin seeds”]B000JMBECW[/amazon-product]
    3 – 4 cloves of garlic
    2 green chilies
    2 sprigs of curry leaves
    For seasoning (Optional)
    Coconut oil – 2 tsp
    1 tsp black [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard seeds”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product]
    2 –3 finely sliced shallots
    2 –3 dried red chilies
    1 tsp raw rice (*my sister reminded me about this one. must say it makes a huge difference*)
    2 sprigs of curry leaves

    Directions:

  • Boil the tapioca in salted water until it is cooked. You know it is done when a fork can easily mash up the pieces.(while using a pressure cooker I allow it to cook for two whistles). Drain out the water.
  • Grind together coconut,[amazon-product type=”text” text=”cumin”]B000JMBECW[/amazon-product],green chilies,garlic, curry leaves and [amazon-product type=”text” text=”turmeric powder”]B000JMAXOC[/amazon-product] into a smooth paste.
  • Add the ground mixture to the tapioca and mix well.
  • Serve with Kerala chicken, beef or fish curry.
  • Seasoning
      This is an optional step. If you have old leftover mashed tapioca  or if there is no side dish accompanying the mashed tapioca, seasoning helps to add flavor.
  • Heat oil in a pan, add [amazon-product type=”text” text=”mustard seeds”]B001E6CFAW[/amazon-product] and as they pop, curry leaves, shallots,red chilies, raw rice and sauté until the shallots are caramelized. Add and fold into the mashed tapioca.